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Must virtual methods be always implemented in derived class?
Can I write something like this?

<!-- language: lang-cpp -->
class BaseInterface 
{
public:
   virtual void fun_a() = 0;
   virtual void fun_b() = 0;
   virtual ~BaseInterface(); 
};

class Derived : public BaseInterface
{
   void fun_a() { ... };
};

class FinalClass : public Derived
{
   void fun_b() { ... };
}

int main()
{
   FinalClass test_obj;
   test_obj.fun_a();  // use Derived implementation or fail ???
   test_obj.fun_b();  // use own implementation 
   BaseInterface* test_interface = new FinalClass();
   test_interface->fun_a(); // fail or ok ???
   test_interface->fun_b(); 
}

Is the code above correct?
Does another virtual method outflank exist?

share|improve this question
    
Have a look here at this example: liveworkspace.org/code/6huYU$8 It seems to work. –  Tony The Lion Mar 5 '13 at 12:02
    
What doesn't work is this: liveworkspace.org/code/6huYU$10 –  Tony The Lion Mar 5 '13 at 12:03
    
Try it and see. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 5 '13 at 12:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Pure virtual methods always must be reimplemented in derived class?

Actually a derived class which is going to be instantiated.

In your code, you didn't make an object from Derived so it's OK.

Can i write something like this?

Yes.

You had some minor errors that I corrected them:

class BaseInterface
{
public:
    virtual void fun_a() = 0;
    virtual void fun_b() = 0;

    virtual ~BaseInterface() {};  // You forget this
};

class Derived : public BaseInterface
{
public:
    void fun_a() {}  // This should be public as its base
};

class FinalClass : public Derived
{
public:
    void fun_b() {} // This should be public as its base
};

int main()
{
    FinalClass test_obj;
    test_obj.fun_a();
    test_obj.fun_b();
    BaseInterface* test_interface = new FinalClass();
    test_interface->fun_a();
    test_interface->fun_b();
}
share|improve this answer
    
devied class? Or you mean derived class. –  DeadWarlock Mar 5 '13 at 12:06
    
@DeadWarlock: derived. typo. –  M M. Mar 5 '13 at 12:10

It makes Derived also an abstract class which you cannot instantiate, seeing you don't implement all the virtual functions from it's base, it becomes an abstract class you cannot directly instantiate.

See here: liveworkspace.org/code/6huYU$10

For the rest, your code should work.

share|improve this answer

Code is correct. There is no special concept for interface in C++. All are classes. Some of the class methods can be pure virtual. It only means that compiler cannot create an instance of such class.

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