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#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main (void)
{
    int a[] = {1,2,3,4,5};
    int b[] = {0,0,0,0,0};
    int *p = b;

    for (int i =0; i < 5; i++)
    {
        b[i] = a[i]+1;
        *p = a[i]+1;
        p++;
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {
        printf (" %i \t %i \t %i \n", *p++, b[i], a[i]);
    }
    return 0;
}

For this code I get why the output for a and b but why does the pointer have the same value of a?

*p is b[0] = a[0]+1, isn't it? So p++ means next address over for b so it's b[1]=a[1]+1.

ie 
*p  b  a
1  2  1
2  3  2
3  4  3
4  5  4
5  6  5
share|improve this question
    
You mislabeled your columns: it should be *p b a, not a b *p. – dasblinkenlight Mar 5 '13 at 13:26
    
yeah i did , my bad. Fixed – user2135885 Mar 5 '13 at 13:27
    
For the sake of change-resistence, better do int b[sizeof(a)/sizeof(a[0])] = {... and replace the 5 values by the same term. This way, you can change the array a and everything will be ok. – glglgl Jul 12 '13 at 6:24
up vote 9 down vote accepted

You are getting undefined behavior. At the end of the first loop p points to "one past the end" of b. Without resetting it, you then dereference it and continue to increment it, both of which cause undefined behavior.

It may be that on your implementation the array a is stored immediately after array b and that p has started to point into array a. This would be one possible "undefined" bahaviour.

share|improve this answer
    
so basically it can be anything, just in this case it appears to point to the next address in the memory in this case which it points to the starting element of array a? correct me if i am wrong. Thanks – user2135885 Mar 5 '13 at 13:31
    
exactly. it can be anything. The best case is that it crashes so you are aware something is wrong early. – UmNyobe Mar 5 '13 at 13:33
    
@user2135885: To me it seems like a reasonable explanation although it is possible that there is a more obscure reason for the coincidence that you are seeing. – Charles Bailey Mar 5 '13 at 13:33

after the first for{},p point at b[5],but the size of b is 5,so b[5] value is unknow,the printf *p is the same value as a[i],the reason may be in memory b[5] is a[0].

share|improve this answer

I think what you need to do is to add a p = p - 5;

#include <stdio.h>
int main (void)
{
    int a[] = {1,2,3,4,5};
    int b[] = {0,0,0,0,0};
    int *p = b;
       int i =0;

    for (i =0; i < 5; i++)
    {
        b[i] = a[i]+1;
        *p = a[i]+1;
        p++;
    }
    p = p - 5;
    for (i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {
        printf (" %i \t %i \t %i \n", *p++, b[i], a[i]);
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
better: p = b again, as the 5 might change. – glglgl Jul 12 '13 at 6:23

you shouldnt make seperate loop for printing and incrementing the values of the array . do both in same loop and do the follouwing to get ur output :) #include #include

int main(void)
{

int a[]={1,2,3,4,5};
int b[]={0,0,0,0,0};
int c[]={0,0,0,0,0};
int *p;
int i;
p=c;
for( i =0 ; i<5 ; i++)
{
    b[i]=a[i]+1;
    *p=b[i]-1;
    //*p++;

//for( i =0 ; i<5 ; i++)

    printf(" %i \t %i \t %i \n" ,*p,b[i],a[i]);

}
return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

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