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Possible Duplicate:
Bypassing buffering of subprocess output with popen in C or Python

I'm building a wrapper around a server cmd line script that should run indefinitely. What I need to do is to get the current stout without waiting for the subprocess to finish.

I mean, if I run the following, everything works fine:

ls = Popen(["ls"], stdout=PIPE)
output = ls.stdout.read()

But if I do the same with an indefinitelly running program:

server = Popen(["python","-m","SimpleHTTPServer"], stdout=PIPE)
output = server.stdout.read()

It will not come back...

Update: Even

 output = server.stdout.read(1) 

hangs...

Do you know if there's a way to capture partial output from a Popen (or similar threading implementation) in an OS independent way?

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marked as duplicate by Gilles, Bill the Lizard Jan 27 '12 at 13:27

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
See the solutions here –  Ned Deily Oct 5 '09 at 21:43
    
Is this cross platform? (it doesn't look like) –  Santi Oct 5 '09 at 21:56
    
There is a description of the basic problem and a couple of solutions there. If you can modify the running process to do flushes, that is best. If you can't, Alex outlined the pexpect/wexpect trick which should cover both Unix-y and Windows platform. If those don't work and you can't change the way the child process writes/flushes to stdout and stderr, you're likely out of luck. –  Ned Deily Oct 5 '09 at 22:09
    
@Santi: confirmed -- pexpect on all Unix variants inc. Mac, wexpect on Windows (if you're running on anything else there may or may not be a solution for other peculiar platforms). –  Alex Martelli Oct 5 '09 at 22:25
    
Alright, I'll check those out to see if I'm lucky :) Tks both. –  Santi Oct 5 '09 at 22:34

1 Answer 1

i would guess that read() returns the entire contents? If you read a fixed size chunk in a loop you may get better results.

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Sorry, forgot to mention that doesn't work either: server.stdout.read(1) hangs too. –  Santi Oct 5 '09 at 21:42

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