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What I have is something like that:

jQuery(function($) {

  'use strict';

  var App = {

    init: function() {
      App.startTool();
    }
[...]

and when I try to call App.init(); from another file it say that App is not defined.

I'm trying to create some test with jasmine and I've the same error.

How can I go inside this "literal class", nested inside a simple function, from external files?

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How/where do you call App.init()? In this demo it is working fine. –  ADC Mar 5 '13 at 14:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Javascript has function scope. This means that variables defined within a function are only visible within that function. To access this variable from outside the function, you'll need to either declare it outside the function, attach it to the window or some other global object directly, or return it as a value from the function.

Declaring outside:

var App;
    jQuery(function($) {

  'use strict';

  App = {

    init: function() {
      App.startTool();
    }
[...]

Attaching to the window or other global namespace:

    jQuery(function($) {

  'use strict';

  window.App = {  //or namespace.App where namespace can be another global variable.

    init: function() {
      App.startTool();
    }
[...]

The way you're wrapping it you're not going to be able to return the value, but if it was a different function you could do this:

var App= (function() {

  'use strict';

  var App = {

    init: function() {
      App.startTool();
    }
return App;
}())

A little more on function scope: Variables declared within a function cannot be seen from outside that function. Variables declared outside a function can be seen from inside a function. So if you want an object to be global, you need to declare it outside any function, or set it as a property on something that already has been declared outside the function. In a browser, the window object is global by default. Other environments like nodejs or rhino will have their own global objects.

Its important to understand how JS scope works because its the foundation behind a lot of the more powerful features of the language, particularly closures and the module pattern.

Some people have also mentioned the benefits of namespacing. This is a good point for this context. Having a single global variable for a library or application allows you to avoid conflicts with other libraries or scripts you might be using. You can then attach your other variables to that global namespace variable and reference them as properties of that object. So instead of calling App.init directly, call myProgram.App.init() for instance.

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yes, maybe declaring it outside is the best solution. –  Ayeye Brazo Mar 5 '13 at 14:12
    
As far as "best" solutions go, I would probably advise the namespace route. But you'll have to declare something outside the function no matter what. –  Ben McCormick Mar 5 '13 at 14:14

If it is not exposed as a global than you can not touch it.

You would have to put it into some namespace that is in the global scope.

jQuery(function($) {

  'use strict';

  var App = {

    init: function() {
      App.startTool();
    }

  }

  if (!window.myNamespace) {
      window.myNamespace = {};
  }
  myNamespace.App = App;


});

The fun thing here is it will not exist until document.ready, not sure why you would want it wrapped with ready. The init call should be called on ready. So you are doing to have race conditions on what widget registers first.

share|improve this answer
    
and how can I test it? –  Ayeye Brazo Mar 5 '13 at 13:58
    
expose it as a global somehow. –  epascarello Mar 5 '13 at 14:00
    
You could also do window.App=App if you really want –  Jan Dvorak Mar 5 '13 at 14:01
2  
Do you really want to pollute the global namespace with tons of variables? I do not, hence one namespace to hold stuff. –  epascarello Mar 5 '13 at 14:02
    
@epascarello depends on the project scope. If the page is small enough, I'm not afraid to neglect proper namespacing :-) –  Jan Dvorak Mar 5 '13 at 14:04

You need to make App globally available if you want to use it from outside the function:

jQuery(function($) {
    'use strict';

    // attach it to window instead of using var
    window.App = {
        init: function() {
            App.startTool();
        }
    };
});
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