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I'm using JPA (EclipseLink 2.4.1) with a mapping-file containing named-queries. Eclipse shows me the following warning message in my mapping file:

No mapping is associated with the state field path 't.progress'.

The warning is of the type JPA Problem. The corresponding lines in my named-queries.xml-file look like this:

<named-query name="FinishedTasks">
    <query><![CDATA[SELECT t FROM Task t WHERE t.progress = 100]]></query>
</named-query>

However, the query runs fine when executed, so no warning in run-time.

Here's what the file Task.java looks like (excerpt):

@Entity
public class Task extends Issue {
    private Integer progress = 0;
    public Integer getProgress() {
        return progress;
    }

    public void setProgress(final Integer progress) {
        this.progress = progress;
    }
}

Issue.java looks like this (excerpt):

@Entity
@Inheritance(strategy = InheritanceType.JOINED)
public class Issue implements Serializable {
    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.AUTO)
    private long id;

    public long getId() {
        return id;
    }
    public void setId(final long id) {
        this.id = id;
    }
}

I have no warnings about queries using Issue.

So my question is, how do I get rid of the warning? And does the warning have some implication I'm not aware of (as said, the query runs fine).

share|improve this question
1  
You copied Item, not Issue... – Alvin Thompson Apr 27 '13 at 18:40
    
Thanks, Alvin. This was a typo when posting my problem... – Bob Apr 27 '13 at 22:02
    
I'm guessing this is just an Eclipse IDE issue. What happens if you use the @NamedQuery annotation instead? – Alvin Thompson Apr 29 '13 at 14:41
    
I get the same warning when using @NamedQuery. – Bob Apr 30 '13 at 20:56
    
There must be something else in one of your files causing the problem. Can you post the whole thing and not just excerpts? – Alvin Thompson May 1 '13 at 5:11
up vote 4 down vote accepted
+25

No mapping is associated with the state field path 't.progress'

I believe this is totally due to the Eclipse JPA Details View (orm.xml editor) and has nothing to do with EclipseLink nor JPA in general. The warning is reminding you that the Named Query is using a JPA query path (t.progress) that is not mapped in the mapping file. The View / xml editor is not analysing the metadata of your java classes, so is not aware whether the it is mapped via JPA annotations.

i.e. the tool is doing the best job for you it possibly can give it's technology / scope limitations.

Solution:

  • understand what the message is saying, manually ensure that the warning is addressed via JPA annotations (OR if you really must, insert the approprate Entity Mappings into your entity mapping XML file), and move on...

:^)

share|improve this answer

This seems to be wrong.

<named-query name="FinishedTasks">
  <query><![CDATA[SELECT t FROM Task t WHERE t.progress = 100]]></query> 
</named-query>

I can't find anything like that with CDATA. See examples at http://wiki.eclipse.org/EclipseLink/Examples/JPA/QueryOptimization

Try this in your named-queries.xml. Or use @NamedQuery annotation like below.

<named-query name="FinishedTasks">
  <query>SELECT t FROM Task t WHERE t.progress = 100</query> 
</named-query>

I just build a test project and use this

package test;

import javax.persistence.Entity; import javax.persistence.NamedQuery;

@Entity
@NamedQuery(name = "FinishedTasks", 
  query = "SELECT t FROM Task t WHERE t.progress = 100")
public class Task extends Issue {
    private Integer progress = 0;

    public Integer getProgress() {
        return progress;
    }

    public void setProgress(final Integer progress) {
        this.progress = progress;
    }
}

Using JUnit didn't resolve to any warning.

package test;

import static org.junit.Assert.assertEquals;

import java.util.List;

import javax.persistence.EntityManager;
import javax.persistence.EntityManagerFactory;
import javax.persistence.Persistence;
import javax.persistence.Query;

import org.junit.After;
import org.junit.AfterClass;
import org.junit.Before;
import org.junit.BeforeClass;
import org.junit.Test;

public class TaskTest {
    private static EntityManager em;

    @BeforeClass
    public static void setUpBeforeClass() throws Exception {
        EntityManagerFactory factory = Persistence.createEntityManagerFactory("test");
        em = factory.createEntityManager();

        em.getTransaction().begin();
        Task t = new Task();
        t.setProgress(100);
        em.persist(t);
        em.getTransaction().commit();
    }

    @AfterClass
    public static void tearDownAfterClass() throws Exception {
        em.close();
    }

    @Test
    public void test() {
        Query q = em.createNamedQuery("FinishedTasks");
        List<?> list = q.getResultList();

        int expected = 1;
        int actual = list.size();
        assertEquals(actual, expected);
    }
}

My log

[EL Info]: 2013-05-01 21:57:55.561--ServerSession(1763596)--EclipseLink, version: Eclipse Persistence Services - 2.4.1.v20121003-ad44345 [EL Info]: connection: 2013-05-01

share|improve this answer
    
Removing CDATA does not solve the problem. Anyways, CDATA should not make a difference as it only affects the parsing of the XML. – Bob May 1 '13 at 21:46

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