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I have an AsyncTask updating an ActionBarSherlock progress implementation. Somehow the onProgressUpdate is throwing a threading error though it claims to execute on the UI thread.

protected void onProgressUpdate(Integer... values)
{
    setSupportProgress(values[0]);
}

The error is:

03-06 00:13:11.672: E/AndroidRuntime(4183): at com.anthonymandra.framework.GalleryActivity$ShareTask.onProgressUpdate(GalleryActivity.java:476)

Only the original thread that created a view hierarchy can touch its views.

As far as I can tell I should be accessing the UI thread for this...

I have many working AsyncTasks in my app, but as requested here's the doInBackground (simplified):

for (MediaObject image : toShare)
{
    BufferedInputStream imageData = image.getThumbStream();
    File swapFile = getSwapFile(...);
    write(swapFile, imageData);
    ++completed;
    float progress = (float) completed / toShare.size();
    int progressLocation = (int) Math.ceil(progressRange * progress);
    onProgressUpdate(progressLocation);
}
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2  
can you post the stack trace. are you sure it isn't something in doInBackground? –  J.Romero Mar 5 '13 at 14:33
2  
Can you post your doInBackground() method and/or setSupportProgress()? –  Mike D Mar 5 '13 at 14:35
    
@Anthony please post an update as to what the mistake was so that other users don't search for something that didn't exist. –  J.Romero Mar 5 '13 at 15:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Okay so the problem is you are calling onProgressUpdate when you should call publishProgress. The OP figured out this himself/herself so I just copy pasted it so he/she does not need to wait to accept the answer. Below is information how AsyncTasks works and it is good knowledge.


Are you creating the AsyncTask on the UI thread? If you are not that is the problem. onProgressUpdate will be run on the thread that created the AsyncTask.

Update: Let us have some code digging time (API 15 source code)!

protected final void publishProgress(Progress... values) {
    if (!isCancelled()) {
        sHandler.obtainMessage(MESSAGE_POST_PROGRESS,
                new AsyncTaskResult<Progress>(this, values)).sendToTarget();
    }
}

This fellow will call it's static Handler sHandler. The documentation says:

When you create a new Handler, it is bound to the thread / message queue of the thread that is creating it -- from that point on, it will deliver messages and runnables to that message queue and execute them as they come out of the message queue.

Thanks to Bruno Mateus with his documentation look-up skills:

Look that, i found at documentation page: Threading rules - There are a few threading rules that must be followed for this class to work properly: - The AsyncTask class must be loaded on the UI thread. This is done automatically as of JELLY_BEAN. - The task instance must be created on the UI thread. execute(Params...) must be invoked on the UI thread. - Do not call onPreExecute(), onPostExecute(Result), doInBackground(Params...), onProgressUpdate(Progress...) manually. - The task can be executed only once (an exception will be thrown if a second execution is attempted.)

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1  
Can you provide evidence of this? The documentation states it will 'Run on the UI thread'. Not the thread that started the AsyncTask. –  J.Romero Mar 5 '13 at 14:46
    
And the link: developer.android.com/reference/android/os/… –  Mike D Mar 5 '13 at 14:52
    
It's called in OnShareTargetSelected. I'd imagine this would occur on the UI thread but I suppose it could be a new thread. I'm going try executing the AsyncTask on the UI thread. If this works it really really needs to be documented better. –  Anthony Mar 5 '13 at 15:06
1  
There is a misunderstood about the documentation, when it says "An asynchronous task is defined by a computation that runs on a background thread and whose result is published on the UI thread." What it means, is given the general proposal of AsyncTask, " enables proper and easy use of the UI thread. Allows to perform background operations and publish results on the UI thread without having to manipulate threads and/or handlers." Its result should be published on UI. So, usually developer used it as inner class or inside the UI thread and those cases no exceptions will be throw. –  Bruno Mateus Mar 5 '13 at 15:09
1  
Look that, i found at documentation page: Threading rules - There are a few threading rules that must be followed for this class to work properly: - The AsyncTask class must be loaded on the UI thread. This is done automatically as of JELLY_BEAN. - The task instance must be created on the UI thread. execute(Params...) must be invoked on the UI thread. - Do not call onPreExecute(), onPostExecute(Result), doInBackground(Params...), onProgressUpdate(Progress...) manually. - The task can be executed only once (an exception will be thrown if a second execution is attempted.) –  Bruno Mateus Mar 5 '13 at 15:22

You can declare your AsyncTask as a innerclass of your activity like that:

public void onClick(View v) {
   new DownloadImageTask().execute("http://example.com/image.png");
}

 private class DownloadImageTask extends AsyncTask {
      protected Bitmap doInBackground(String... urls) {
          return loadImageFromNetwork(urls[0]);
     }

     protected void onPostExecute(Bitmap result) {
          mImageView.setImageBitmap(result);
     }
 }
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OP posted this as a comment on my question: "I wrapped the AsyncTask in runOnUiThread. Same error." I bet his problem lies else where. –  Simon Zettervall Mar 5 '13 at 15:21
    
It is an inner class. I was hoping to simplify the question. I guess I should have just been explicit. –  Anthony Mar 5 '13 at 15:22

I was manually calling:

onProgressUpdate

You should call

publishProgress

Easy mistake, but great info. Simon and Bruno deserve the credit, post the answer if you like. Thanks for the fast and extensive response!

share|improve this answer
    
You are welcome, I am glad you found out the problem! –  Simon Zettervall Mar 5 '13 at 15:57
    
You are welcome! –  Bruno Mateus Mar 5 '13 at 16:58

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