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I am trying to compile my code in VS 2010 that compiles and works in gcc, but I get a weird error on a lambda expression:

   std::function<double (size_t level, size_t q)> doLevel = [&](size_t level, size_t q)
   {  //line 52
       double thisLevelP = density(q, data[level]);
       if(level==T-1) return thisLevelP;
       if(level==t-1) return  thisLevelP*A(q,state)*doLevel(level+1,state);
       double continuation = 0.0;
       for(size_t i=0; i<Q; ++i)
       {
           continuation += A(q, i)*doLevel(level+1, i);
       }
       return thisLevelP*continuation;
   };

The error is:

Error   1   error C2086: 'size_t &_T' : redefinition    c:\users\ga1009\documents\phd\cpp\pmi\cpp\test\baumiterationtest.cpp    52
Error   2   error C2661: '`anonymous-namespace'::`anonymous-namespace'::<lambda1>::<lambda1>' : no overloaded function takes 8 arguments    c:\users\ga1009\documents\phd\cpp\pmi\cpp\test\baumiterationtest.cpp    52

What is wrong?

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3  
By the way, you have some UB. You need to explicitly specify the return type of the lambda in this case. –  chris Mar 5 '13 at 15:18
1  
How about an SSCCE? –  Andy Prowl Mar 5 '13 at 15:19
    
Which line is which line? Indicate that. I don't see any size_t & _T in the posted code. –  Nawaz Mar 5 '13 at 15:19
1  
@Grzenio: Undefined Behavior –  Andy Prowl Mar 5 '13 at 15:20
1  
@Grzenio, Here's what the standard says: if the compound-statement is of the form { attribute-specifier-seqoptreturn expression ; } the type of the returned expression after lvalue-to-rvalue conversion (4.1), array-to-pointer conversion (4.2), and function-to-pointer conversion (4.3); — otherwise, void. Since your body does not follow that template, it would have a void return type on a conforming compiler, and you return a double. If it was something like return 2.5 * 6.5;, the return type would be implicitly deduced. –  chris Mar 5 '13 at 15:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As seen in the comments above by chris, lambdas with multiple return statements need an explicit return type which can be declared like this ->double.

More importantly though the offending line is the variable named t which is captured by the lambda. I originally though this was a name clash but as STL correctly points out it happens with any two names which are the same except one is capital. This is a compiler bug which is known and has been fixed in the newest versions.

double density(std::size_t, int)
{
    return 0;
}
double A(std::size_t, int)
{
    return 0;
}
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int data[] = {1,2,3};
    std::size_t T = 1;
    std::size_t t = 2;   //<<<<< change this name and it compiles
    std::size_t state = 3;
    std::size_t Q = 4;
    std::function<double (int,int)> doLevel = [&](int level, int q)->double
   { 
       double thisLevelP = density(q, data[level]);
      if(level==T-1) 
           return thisLevelP;
      if(level==t-1) 
           return  thisLevelP*A(q,state)*doLevel(level+1,state);
       double continuation = 0.0;
       for(size_t i=0; i<Q; ++i)
       {
           continuation += A(q, i)*doLevel(level+1, i);
       }
       return thisLevelP*continuation;
   };
}
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+1 for creating an SSCCE. The code fails to compile in VS2012 also. –  Praetorian Mar 5 '13 at 15:51
    
looks like STL used the wrong name (I mean the guy and the library ;) –  PorkyBrain Mar 5 '13 at 15:52
1  
Minimum reproducible example int main() { unsigned T = 1, t = 1; auto f = [&](){ return T && t; }; } Fails with error C2086: 'unsigned int &_T' : redefinition –  Praetorian Mar 5 '13 at 15:59
    
I filed a bug report (my first ever, how exciting) –  PorkyBrain Mar 5 '13 at 16:20
1  
1. This is a compiler bug, not a library bug. 2. "T" and "t" aren't special. "Foo" and "foo" will trigger it too. 3. This was reported as connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/746135/… and has been fixed. The fix will be available in VC12 (note: VC9 = VS 2008, VC10 = VS 2010, VC11 = VS 2012). –  Stephan T. Lavavej Mar 6 '13 at 3:43

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