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Recently I came across a web server for Ruby known as Unicorn, it had a simple yet brilliant idea:

When the Unicorn master starts, it loads our app into memory. As soon as it’s ready to serve requests it forks 16 workers. Those workers then select() on the socket, only serving requests they’re capable of handling. In this way the kernel handles the load balancing for us.

A parallel for this would be to setup a local tomcat cluster with -Xmx384MB each and then have each individual one "select() on a shared socket, only serving requests they’re capable of handling"

I'm wondering how to tweak tomcat source code or some script in order to make this happen?

Think of all the possibilities if you could use Foreman to run 3 concurrent tomcat app servers at once!

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Tomcat already does that: It starts N worker threads (you can configure N) and it will forward each request to the respective web app. If 100 users try to access the same web app, their requests will be shared between the N threads and each will be executing code of the app.

EDIT Einhorn isn't Java EE compliant, so it can cut many corners. To do something similar with Tomcat, you will need to start several Tomcat processes (each will need their own socket) and a load-balancer proxy/http server in the front that distributes the load.

Your apps also need to be designed for this at the database level (i.e. they must be able to handle several processes writing to the same tables).

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Thanks and I'm looking for process level availability here so I still want to find out how to setup multiple processes rather than scale the threads. Einhorn looks promising, I'm still digging into it: stripe.com/blog/meet-einhorn – pulkitsinghal Mar 5 '13 at 15:53
    
Einhorn isn't J2EE compliant, so it can cut many corners. To do something similar with Tomcat, you will need to start several Tomcat processes (each will need their own socket) and a load-balancer proxy/http server in the front that distributes the load. – Aaron Digulla Mar 5 '13 at 15:56
    
And that's what I'm trying to avoid! I would love to change a little bit of source code in tomcat somewhere (or perhaps legacy secrets already exist) such that I can start multiple tomcats to use a shared socket/port. – pulkitsinghal Mar 5 '13 at 18:04
    
I really don't see what the advantage of this would be; it would certainly make Tomcat slower since you'd need to pass each request to a new process (i.e. there is a full process context switch instead of just a thread context switch). There really isn't that much you gain by having the kernel handle the load balancing. – Aaron Digulla Mar 6 '13 at 10:44
    
I respect that opinion, I would like to make measurements for myself as I hear good things about the shared socket / select() approach where workers pick up & serve requests they’re capable of handling. – pulkitsinghal Mar 6 '13 at 13:31

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