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I like to print a string that is got as an input from the user in a Pyramid form letter by letter. For example - When a user gives an input as "string" then the output should be:

     s
    s t
   s t r
  s t r i
 s t r i n
s t r i n g

I've tried a small program but it doesn't arranges the words in Pyramid form. The program is

    import java.io.*;
    import java.util.Scanner;
    import java.lang.String;

    public class Mainer {
    public static void main(String args[]){
       try
       {
           Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
           String s;
           int l;
           System.out.println("Enter the String : ");
           s = sc.nextLine();
           l = s.length();
           for(int i=0; i<l;i++)
           {

               for(int j=0;j<i;j++)
               {
                   System.out.printf("%c ",s.charAt(j));
               }
               System.out.printf("%c\n",s.charAt(i));
           }         

       }
       catch(Exception e)
       {
           System.err.println(e);
       }
    }
}

And the output of the above program is(when string is given as input) Enter the String : string

s
s t
s t r
s t r i
s t r i n
s t r i n g

Can you make it arranged as the first example?

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closed as too localized by Luiggi Mendoza, Reimeus, user714965, Tom, IronMan84 Mar 6 '13 at 14:10

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9  
Yes we can, but that's your job. –  Luiggi Mendoza Mar 5 '13 at 16:02
1  
you are not printing space anywhere that is why its like that you should print spaces before start printing the characters. –  kaysush Mar 5 '13 at 16:05
5  
I smell homework all the way to Norway. –  Andreas Mar 5 '13 at 16:06
    
no matter if it is homework, an interesting question. +1 –  Kent Mar 5 '13 at 16:41
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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to add the half the length of the string as number of spaces (padding) in front of the string before you output it. But subtracting 1 space each time as you iterate in order to create the shape.

Or another way to say it is that you're getting the length of the original string and printing out the number of spaces for the characters you didn't print.

for(int x = 0; x < l - i; x++) {
    System.out.print(" ");          
}
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So what your program needs to do is pad out the text with spaces. In your first example, your first output is actually one letter, but in the same position as the middle letter of the last output.

So the first output in pseudo-code would look something like:

String padding = (text.length/2) number of spaces;
// The padding on the left.
Print padding
// The letter to print.
Print first letter

Keep in mind that the length of the padding will change with the length of the text you are outputting in that iteration.. but I'm not going to tell you that. That would ruin all the fun :)

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2  
+1 for pseudo-code –  Serkan Arıkuşu Mar 5 '13 at 16:12
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just write another for loop to print spaces

for(int i=0; i<l;i++)
{

    for(int j=0; j<l-(i+1); j++)
    {
        System.out.print(" ");
    }

    for(int j=0;j<i;j++)
    {
        System.out.printf("%c ",s.charAt(j));
    }
    System.out.printf("%c\n",s.charAt(i));
}  

for the record, you might have to tweak this.

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IMHO in this case your answer would be better without code since OP is spouse to figure by himself. –  Pshemo Mar 5 '13 at 16:13
    
@Pshemo are you afraid that it is possible for the OP to incorporate the code I've posted without Groking it? –  Sam I am Mar 5 '13 at 16:14
    
I assume that OP probably saw examples of how loops work. All he need to do now is to try to figure out how to use them to solve different kind of problems. Giving him fish (code) instead of rod (good general advice) will not really help him in long term. PS. Sorry for late replay, I don't use English often :). –  Pshemo Mar 5 '13 at 16:23
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is this cheating? (only one loop)

String s = "string";
        int len = s.length();           
        String tmp = "";
        for (char c : s.toCharArray()) {
            tmp += tmp.length() > 0 ? " " + String.valueOf(c) : String.valueOf(c);
            System.out.printf("%" + (len + tmp.length() - 1) + "s\n", tmp);
            len--;
        }

output:

     s
    s t
   s t r
  s t r i
 s t r i n
s t r i n g
share|improve this answer
    
this looks complicated! –  Gowtham Mar 5 '13 at 16:29
    
@Gowtham no, it is not. and it is short. (only one loop):) –  Kent Mar 5 '13 at 16:36
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That should do the trick

import java.io.*;
import java.util.Scanner;
import java.lang.String;

public class Mainer {
public static void main(String args[]){
   try
   {
       Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
       String s;
       int l;
       System.out.println("Enter the String : ");
       s = sc.nextLine();
       l = s.length();
       for(int i=0; i<l;i++)
       {
           int padding = s.length() - i;
           if (padding> 0) {
               System.out.printf("%" + padding + "s", " ");
           }
           for(int j=0;j<i;j++)
           {
               System.out.printf("%c ",s.charAt(j));
           }
           System.out.printf("%c\n",s.charAt(i));
       }         

   }
   catch(Exception e)
   {
       System.err.println(e);
   }
}
}
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