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My collect() function calls Foo.f(). I would like to make Foo.f() itself a parameter of my function. Is this possible in Java?

  • How can I pass either Foo.f() or Foo.g() (or any other function of Foo that returns a String) to my function?
  • Is there an already existing function which walks a collection and collects the result of calling a method of every collection item?

.

class Foo {
    public String f() { return "f"; }
    public String g() { return "g"; }
    // ...
}

public List<String> collect(List<Foo> foos)
{
    List<String> result = new ArrayList<String>();

    for (final Foo foo: foos) {
        result.add(foo.f());  // I want Foo.f to be a parameter
    }

    return result;
}

Update

I would like to point out the fact that I am not merely calling the same function but rather the member function f for all items of the List<Foo> collection.

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marked as duplicate by nawfal, Raedwald, DNA, Jeen Broekstra, Divi Jul 5 at 12:29

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
You can always use the reflection API and pass a Method object. –  duffymo Mar 5 '13 at 16:19
    
Or you could create an interface... –  pamphlet Mar 5 '13 at 16:20
2  
Check out the Command Pattern. Function pointers don't exist in java, except with reflection –  Sotirios Delimanolis Mar 5 '13 at 16:20
    
For your first question check below link: stackoverflow.com/questions/4685563/… –  Mubin Mar 5 '13 at 16:20
1  
(a) interface, (b) reflection, (c) - switch to C# :) Come to the dark side, we have cookies :) –  Sten Petrov Mar 5 '13 at 16:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In Java 8, you can do

collect(foos, Foo::f);

public List<String> collect(List<Foo> foos, Function<Foo,String> func)
{
    List<String> result = new ArrayList<String>();

    for (final Foo foo: foos) {
        result.add(func.apply(foo);
    }

    return result;
}

Or with steam API

Stream<Foo> foos = ...;
Stream<String> strs = foos.map(Foo::f);
share|improve this answer
    
Java 8 is not exactly stable yet. In earlier versions of Java, closures and function pointers are not supported. –  RudolphEst Mar 5 '13 at 16:27
    
@RudolphEst But if you were asking this question, you probably aren't going to be producing much software for a while. Might as well use Java SE 8 now. / Java SE 8 does not have function pointers, and "lambdas" aren't really any more of a closure than anonymous inner classes (the point being that the syntax is less verbose). –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Mar 5 '13 at 16:43
    
@TomHawtin-tackline It depends. If the OP is a student at university, he might be constrained to use Java 7 in his projects. –  RudolphEst Mar 5 '13 at 16:51

you can use interfaces

  interface Foo
  {
      String fn();
  }

and pass the interface to the method

 void anyMethod(Foo f)
 {
   f.fn();
 }

you dont need to create a concrete Foo, just create Foo anonymously

  new Foo() {

  @Override
  public String fn()
  {
   return "something";
  }
};
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I don't see, how this solution works with collect() since I am not calling simply the same function but rather the same function for different items of the collection. –  Micha Wiedenmann Mar 5 '13 at 18:00
    
@MichaWiedenmann you can simply call any method inside fn() –  Sleiman Jneidi Mar 5 '13 at 18:58
    
If possible I would appreciate a worked out example using the technique you suggested. –  Micha Wiedenmann Mar 5 '13 at 20:06

In Java you are not supposed to pass method as a parameter, but you can pass an object as parameter.

It is called Strategy Pattern, you would need to use interface.

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You can use an interface like:

interface IFoo {
    String getString();
}

Then implement it in the custom ways:

class F implements IFoo {
    public String getString() {
        return "f";
    }
}

class G implements IFoo {
    public String getString() {
        return "g";
    }
}

And have your function take a list of anything that implements IFoo:

public List<String> collect(List<? extends IFoo> foos)
{
    List<String> result = new ArrayList<String>();

    for (final IFoo foo: foos) {
        result.add(foo.getString());
    }

    return result;
}

Usage:

for (String a : collect(Arrays.asList(new F(), new G()))) {
    System.out.println(a);
}
    //Prints f and g
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