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Right now I'm able to get the Next Alarm in a String value. I would like to get it in milliseconds. Here is what I've tried but it doesn't work. Also I use Locale.US but would like it work for any Locale. Please advise

String nextAlarm = android.provider.Settings.System.getString(getContentResolver(), android.provider.Settings.System.NEXT_ALARM_FORMATTED);

    DateFormat format = new SimpleDateFormat("EEE hh:mm aa", Locale.US);
    long nextAlarmTime = 0;
    try {
        Date date = format.parse(nextAlarm);
        nextAlarmTime = date.getTime();
    } catch (Exception e) {
    }

    long curTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    long diff = nextAlarmTime - curTime;

    //diff would represent the time in milliseconds
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You should accept the answer of przemelek – Massimo Jun 22 '15 at 7:49

Code for Date not milliseconds ;-) But next call getTime() on it, and you will get time in ms.

I'm using this code in my small app for calculating time when I should go to sleep, base on time of next alarm. It was created by 2 hours of trying different appraches, so for sure it may be optimized.

    public static Date getNextAlarm(Context context) {
    // let's collect short names of days :-)        
    DateFormatSymbols symbols = new DateFormatSymbols();
    // and fill with those names map...
    Map<String, Integer> map = new HashMap<String, Integer>();
    String[] dayNames = symbols.getShortWeekdays();
    // filing :-)
    map.put(dayNames[Calendar.MONDAY],Calendar.TUESDAY);
    map.put(dayNames[Calendar.TUESDAY],Calendar.WEDNESDAY);
    map.put(dayNames[Calendar.WEDNESDAY],Calendar.THURSDAY);
    map.put(dayNames[Calendar.THURSDAY],Calendar.FRIDAY);
    map.put(dayNames[Calendar.FRIDAY],Calendar.SATURDAY);
    map.put(dayNames[Calendar.SATURDAY],Calendar.SUNDAY);
    map.put(dayNames[Calendar.SUNDAY],Calendar.MONDAY);
    // Yeah, knowing next alarm will help.....
    String nextAlarm = Settings.System.getString(context.getContentResolver(),Settings.System.NEXT_ALARM_FORMATTED);
    // In case if it isn't set.....
    if ((nextAlarm==null) || ("".equals(nextAlarm))) return null;
    // let's see a day....
    String nextAlarmDay = nextAlarm.split(" ")[0];
    // and its number....
    int alarmDay = map.get(nextAlarmDay);

    // the same for day of week (I'm not sure why I didn't use Calendar.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK) here...
    Date now = new Date();      
    String dayOfWeek = new SimpleDateFormat("EE", Locale.getDefault()).format(now);     
    int today = map.get(dayOfWeek);

    // OK, so let's calculate how many days we have to next alarm :-)
    int daysToAlarm = alarmDay-today;
    // yep, sometimes it will  be negtive number so add 7.
    if (daysToAlarm<0) daysToAlarm+=7;



    // Now we will build date, and parse it.....
    try {
        Calendar cal2 = Calendar.getInstance();
        String str = cal2.get(Calendar.YEAR)+"-"+(cal2.get(Calendar.MONTH)+1)+"-"+(cal2.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH));

        SimpleDateFormat df  = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-d hh:mm");

        cal2.setTime(df.parse(str+nextAlarm.substring(nextAlarm.indexOf(" "))));
        cal2.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_YEAR, daysToAlarm);
        // and return it
        return cal2.getTime();
    } catch (Exception e) {

    }
    // in case if we cannot calculate...
    return null;
}
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It doesn't work: 1) Korean Language -> Nullpointer Exception. 2) Alarm with PM -> wrong result. 3) Alarm same weekday but next week -> wrong result – andreas1724 Feb 2 at 13:56

Looking at Alarms.java in alarm clock app, which is responsible for setting this variable, the correct format is either "E h:mm aa" or "E k:mm" depending on 12/24 hour mode. I parse it using SimpleDateFormat and copy the valid fields using Calendar over to current date:

String format = android.text.format.DateFormat.is24HourFormat(context) ? "E k:mm" : "E h:mm aa";
Calendar nextAlarmCal = Calendar.getInstance();
Calendar nextAlarmIncomplete = Calendar.getInstance();
nextAlarmIncomplete.setTime(new SimpleDateFormat(format).parse(nextAlarm));

// replace valid fields of the current time with what we got in nextAlarm
int[] fieldsToCopy = {Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY,Calendar.MINUTE,Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK};
for (int field : fieldsToCopy) {
   nextAlarmCal.set(field, nextAlarmIncomplete.get(field));
}
nextAlarmCal.set(Calendar.SECOND, 0);

// if the alarm is next week we have wrong date now (in the past). Adding 7 days should fix this 
if (nextAlarmCal.before(Calendar.getInstance())) {
   nextAlarmCal.add(Calendar.DATE, 7);
}
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On devices with API 21 and above, you can achieve the milliseconds with getSystemService():

if (android.os.Build.VERSION.SDK_INT >= android.os.Build.VERSION_CODES.LOLLIPOP) {
    AlarmManager.AlarmClockInfo info = 
        ((AlarmManager)getSystemService(Context.ALARM_SERVICE)).getNextAlarmClock();
    if (info != null) {
        long alarmTime = info.getTriggerTime();
        SimpleDateFormat simpleDateFormat = 
            new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd hh:mm a", Locale.US);
        Log.d(getClass().getSimpleName(),
            simpleDateFormat.format(new Date(alarmTime)));
    }
}

On older devices, you have to look up the alarm string in the database:

String nextAlarm = Settings.System.getString(getContentResolver(),
                       Settings.System.NEXT_ALARM_FORMATTED);

The format of the retrieved string depends i.a. on the locale of the running device. The string is made up of

  • the digits for the time (Arabian, Indian, ...?)

  • String from

    String[] weekdays = DateFormatSymbols.getInstance().getShortWeekdays();
    
  • String from

    String[] amPm = DateFormatSymbols.getInstance().getAmPmStrings();
    

You cannot rely on the order of the weekday-time-AmPm-components. For example, the AmPm-String is not always placed at the end. In Korea, it is usually placed between the weekday and the time.


My solution:

AlarmTimeTool.java:

import java.util.Calendar;
import java.util.regex.Matcher;
import java.util.regex.Pattern;

public class AlarmTimeTool {

    public static long getNextAlarm(String alarm, String[] weekdays, String[] amPm) {
        int alarmHours = -1, alarmMinutes = -1;
        int alarmWeekday = -1; // Calendar.SUNDAY = 1; Calendar.SATURDAY = 7;
        int alarmAmPm = -1; // Calendar.AM = 0; Calendar.PM = 1;

        for (String piece: alarm.split("\\s")) {
            if (alarmWeekday == -1) {
                alarmWeekday = getWeekday(piece, weekdays);
                if (alarmWeekday != -1) {
                    continue;
                }
            }
            if (alarmHours == -1) {
                int[] hoursMinutes = getTime(piece);
                alarmHours = hoursMinutes[0];
                alarmMinutes = hoursMinutes[1];
                if (alarmHours != -1) {
                    continue;
                }
            }
            if (alarmAmPm == -1) {
                alarmAmPm = getAmPm(piece, amPm);
            }
        }

        if (alarmWeekday == -1 || alarmHours == -1) {
            throw new RuntimeException("could not fetch alarm week or hour");
        }

        Calendar now = Calendar.getInstance();
        Calendar nextAlarm = Calendar.getInstance();
        nextAlarm.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, alarmWeekday);
        nextAlarm.set(Calendar.MINUTE, alarmMinutes);
        nextAlarm.set(Calendar.SECOND, 0);
        nextAlarm.set(Calendar.MILLISECOND, 0);
        if (alarmAmPm == -1) {
            nextAlarm.set(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY, alarmHours);
        } else {
            nextAlarm.set(Calendar.AM_PM, alarmAmPm);
            nextAlarm.set(Calendar.HOUR, alarmHours % 12);
        }
        if (nextAlarm.before(now)) {
            nextAlarm.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, 7);
        }

        return nextAlarm.getTimeInMillis();
    }

    private static int[] getTime(String piece) {
        int hours = -1;
        int minutes = -1;

        // Android only (\d has different meanings):
        Pattern p = Pattern.compile("(\\d{1,2})\\D(\\d{2})");

        Matcher m = p.matcher(piece);
        if (m.find()) {
            hours = Integer.parseInt(m.group(1));
            minutes = Integer.parseInt(m.group(2));
        }
        int[] hoursMinutes = {hours, minutes};
        return hoursMinutes;
    }

    private static int getWeekday(String piece, String[] weekdays) {
        for (int i = 1; i < weekdays.length; i++) {
            if (piece.contains(weekdays[i])) {
                return i;
            }
        }
        return -1;
    }

    private static int getAmPm(String piece, String[] amPm) {
        for (int i = 0; i < amPm.length; i++) {
            if (piece.contains(amPm[i])) {
                return i;
            }
        }
        return -1;
    }
}

MainActivity.java:

import android.app.Activity;
import android.os.Bundle;
import android.provider.Settings;
import android.util.Log;

import java.text.DateFormatSymbols;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.Date;
import java.util.Locale;


public class MainActivity extends Activity {
    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);

        String nextAlarm = Settings.System.getString(getContentResolver(),
                Settings.System.NEXT_ALARM_FORMATTED);
        if (nextAlarm != null && !nextAlarm.isEmpty()) {
            Log.d(getClass().getSimpleName(), nextAlarm);
            String[] weekdays = DateFormatSymbols.getInstance().getShortWeekdays();
            String[] amPm = DateFormatSymbols.getInstance().getAmPmStrings();
            long alarmTime = AlarmTimeTool.getNextAlarm(nextAlarm, weekdays, amPm);
            SimpleDateFormat simpleDateFormat =
                    new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd hh:mm a", Locale.US);
            Log.d(getClass().getSimpleName(), simpleDateFormat.format(new Date(alarmTime)));
        }
    }
}
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