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I have a homework and one of questions is

"Which two layers of the TCP/IP protocol stack perform the same task? Name this task and explain why it is implemented in multiple layers."

I think they are data link and physical layers but I can't name this task and explain why it is implemented in multiple layers.

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closed as off topic by EJP, JE SUIS CHARLIE, Jon Egerton, RaYell, ppeterka Mar 6 '13 at 10:15

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A very off question, but I think I can guess what the instructor has in mind: both IP and TCP calculate a header checksum over some of the fields of the IP header. In IP, it's the whole header whereas in TCP it's portions of the IP header that are part of the TCP pseudoheader. The question becomes: why does the TCP pseudoheader have to incorporate parts of the IP header (which seems redundant because the IP header already has its own checksum). Is that enough of a hint? –  Celada Mar 5 '13 at 22:03
    
Thank you for your interest. However you misunderstand my question. It is about TCP/IP layers (Transport layer,Application layer ,... ).Two of them perform same task. Which are they ? –  VVovoVV Mar 6 '13 at 14:32
    
He misunderstood nothing. More likely you didn't understand his answer. However there is no single answer to this question. I can think of at least three functions that are duplicated. Not a real question. –  EJP Mar 6 '13 at 20:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A question that gives more than one parse tree :P

Anyhow, what I have in mind is the Transport Layer and data-link layer.

When I actually studied Computer Networks, the first example we took for a data-link protocol was HDLC, we studied that it performs retransmission at failure and that was noted as a redundant task since TCP performs the same thing.

Just my two cents, let us know what the actual answer turns out to be.

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I'd say the redundant task we're talking about is the error detection, implemented by the checksum computation by the TCP and IP layers.

Why this, apparently redundant task, is made by both layers is well explained in this old topic about the existence of checksum field in both layers:

why there is separate checksum in TCP and IP headers?

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Thank you for your interest. However you misunderstand my question. It is about TCP/IP layers (Transport layer,Application layer ,... ).Two of them perform same task. Which are they ? –  VVovoVV Mar 6 '13 at 14:33
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@VVovoVV I think you dismiss this answer too easily. It fits the question: two different layers (IP and TCP, corresponding very roughly to network and transport from the OSI model) are both providing integrity protection, and over some of the same data fields. –  Celada Mar 6 '13 at 14:39
    
@VVovoVV He misunderstood nothing. You mentioned the datalink layer and physical layer in your question, and there are at least two others, depending on what model you use. The application layer isn't inside the TCP/IP protocol stack at all, it is in the application. You're talking when you should be listening. –  EJP Mar 6 '13 at 20:05
    
@VVovoVV I am not in need of any instruction from you about THE LAYERS. Your actual point remains incomprehensible. –  EJP Mar 6 '13 at 23:04

I agree that it is a problematic question. There is probably more than one answer, and none of them will be 100% accurate.

My guess is data link (layer 2) and internet (layer 3), because both perform forwarding. The first in the local network and the second between networks. They are implemented in different layers because forwarding between networks can not be done using the data link layer, and forwarding inside LAN can't be done with IP layer.

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