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I want to store a 4-byte int in a char array... such that the first 4 locations of the char array are the 4 bytes of the int.

Then, I want to pull the int back out of the array...

Also, bonus points if someone can give me code for doing this in a loop... IE writing like 8 ints into a 32 byte array.

int har = 0x01010101;
char a[4];
int har2;

// write har into char such that:
// a[0] == 0x01, a[1] == 0x01, a[2] == 0x01, a[3] == 0x01 etc.....

// then, pull the bytes out of the array such that:
// har2 == har

Thanks guys!

EDIT: Assume int are 4 bytes...

EDIT2: Please don't care about endianness... I will be worrying about endianness. I just want different ways to acheive the above in C/C++. Thanks

EDIT3: If you can't tell, I'm trying to write a serialization class on the low level... so I'm looking for different strategies to serialize some common data types.

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8  
Maybe you should do your own homework... And then, if you have any doubts, you can post your code here and we will try to help you then. If you don't try to do it yourself, you are not going to learn anything. –  jpmelos Oct 6 '09 at 0:00
1  
LOL this ain't homework :) –  Polaris878 Oct 6 '09 at 0:03
1  
If you were writing C, you would know better than to initialize a variable with a value. –  Hooked Oct 6 '09 at 0:57
2  
ummmm what? The above is just to get the question across. –  Polaris878 Oct 6 '09 at 0:59
1  
Actually I should only be dealing with POD types (I have a lot of terrain data that I'm sending across a network). Hopefully I won't be dealing with anything too complicated. –  Polaris878 Oct 6 '09 at 22:51
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9 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Not the most optimal way, but is endian safe.


int har = 0x01010101;
char a[4];
a[0] = har & 0xff;
a[1] = (har>>8)  & 0xff;
a[2] = (har>>16) & 0xff;
a[3] = (har>>24) & 0xff;
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Does this run into trouble if har is negative? (I Seem to remember that ther'es something odd about bitshifting and negative ints...) –  Michael Anderson Oct 28 '10 at 7:20
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Unless you care about byte order and such, memcpy will do the trick:

memcpy(a, &har, sizeof(har));
...
memcpy(&har2, a, sizeof(har2));

Of course, there's no guarantee that sizeof(int)==4 on any particular implementation (and there are real-world implementations for which this is in fact false).

Writing a loop should be trivial from here.

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#include <stdio.h>

int main(void) {
    char a[sizeof(int)];
    *((int *) a) = 0x01010101;
    printf("%d\n", *((int *) a));
    return 0;
}

Keep in mind:

A pointer to an object or incomplete type may be converted to a pointer to a different object or incomplete type. If the resulting pointer is not correctly aligned for the pointed-to type, the behavior is undefined.

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3  
The pointer can be converted, but that doesn't mean that it can be dereferenced. E.g. you can convert int* to float* (no U.B.), but as soon as you try to write anything via that float*, you hit U.B. Your example is fine because writing via char* is specifically allowed for PODs, and lifetime of POD starts as soon as memory is allocated for it, but this is worth clarifying. –  Pavel Minaev Oct 6 '09 at 0:10
2  
Actually, sorry, I'm wrong, and this example is still U.B. - specifically, there's no guarantee that a is correctly aligned for int. There is a guarantee when allocating arrays with new, that they will be correctly aligned for any object of the same size as array; but there's no such guarantee for auto or static variables, or member fields. E.g. consider local variable declarations: char c; char a[4]; - there's a good chance that a will not be allocated on a 4-byte boundary, and on some architectures this will result in a crash when you try to write into that location via an int*. –  Pavel Minaev Oct 6 '09 at 0:12
    
Pavel, could you clarify what you mean by POD and U.B.? Thanks –  Polaris878 Oct 6 '09 at 0:12
    
POD = Plain Old Data type and UB = Undefined Behavior. –  Sinan Ünür Oct 6 '09 at 0:14
2  
POD = Plain Old Data. U.B. = Undefined Behavior. The meanings of those two terms are precisely defined in ISO C++ specification. U.B. basically means "anything at all can happen, with no limits". POD means more or less "one of C++ primitive types like int or float, any pointer type, any enum type, array of any POD type, or any struct/classe/union consisting solely of fields of POD types, with no non-public members, no base classes, no explicit ctors or dtors, and no virtual members." –  Pavel Minaev Oct 6 '09 at 0:15
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int main() {
    typedef union foo {
        int x;
        char a[4];
    } foo;

    foo p;
    p.x = 0x01010101;
    printf("%x ", p.a[0]);
    printf("%x ", p.a[1]);
    printf("%x ", p.a[2]);
    printf("%x ", p.a[3]);

    return 0;
}

Bear in mind that the a[0] holds the LSB and a[3] holds the MSB, on a little endian machine.

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Your comment about the LSB and MSB only holds true for little endian architectures. –  1800 INFORMATION Oct 6 '09 at 0:08
5  
The read of p.a in this code invokes U.B., because it was not preceded by a write to a. Any conformant C++ implementation can legally optimize away the assignment to p.x completely, and some will do so. –  Pavel Minaev Oct 6 '09 at 0:08
    
Umm, yes and no. The exact result is U.B., I guess, because it depends on platform architecture, but unions are the one legal way to alias different types and I would be quite surprised at a compiler that didn't totally understand that p.a had been written. In fact, unions are the only official way around type aliasing optimization in gnu implementations. –  DigitalRoss Oct 6 '09 at 0:14
    
That's true, I guess, but unions are not the only way to solve this problem, and there are solutions that do not invoke UB so it is probably best to favour those. –  1800 INFORMATION Oct 6 '09 at 0:21
    
It is not legal to alias any two arbitrary types (unions or not - just don't do this, period), but it is perfectly legal to alias any POD type via a char*, and g++ supports that as well. The only caveat is that to be strictly conformant, you must static_cast to char* rather than reinterpret_cast or C-style cast (which means that you must first static_cast to void*) - though I haven't seen any implementation where that last bit actually makes any difference... –  Pavel Minaev Oct 6 '09 at 0:21
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Don't use unions, Pavel clarifies:

It's U.B., because C++ prohibits accessing any union member other than the last one that was written to. In particular, the compiler is free to optimize away the assignment to int member out completely with the code above, since its value is not subsequently used (it only sees the subsequent read for the char[4] member, and has no obligation to provide any meaningful value there). In practice, g++ in particular is known for pulling such tricks, so this isn't just theory. On the other hand, using static_cast<void*> followed by static_cast<char*> is guaranteed to work.

– Pavel Minaev

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1  
It's U.B., because C++ prohibits accessing any union member other than the last one that was written to. In particular, the compiler is free to optimize away the assignment to int member out completely with the code above, since its value is not subsequently used (it only sees the subsequent read for the char[4] member, and has no obligation to provide any meaningful value there). In practice, g++ in particular is known for pulling such tricks, so this isn't just theory. On the other hand, using static_cast<void*> followed by static_cast<char*> is guaranteed to work. –  Pavel Minaev Oct 6 '09 at 0:04
    
Thought so, I never clarified it, though. If you don't mind, I'll leave your comment as advice. –  GManNickG Oct 6 '09 at 0:09
    
I don't mind, but it would be nice to fix those static_casts :) –  Pavel Minaev Oct 6 '09 at 0:16
    
Fix'd. [15char] –  GManNickG Oct 6 '09 at 0:18
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Note: Accessing a union through an element that wasn't the last one assigned to is undefined behavior. (assuming a platform where characters are 8bits and ints are 4 bytes) A bit mask of 0xFF will mask off one character so

char arr[4];
int a = 5;

arr[3] = a & 0xff;
arr[2] = (a & 0xff00) >>8;
arr[1] = (a & 0xff0000) >>16;
arr[0] = (a & 0xff000000)>>24;

would make arr[0] hold the most significant byte and arr[3] hold the least.

edit:Just so you understand the trick & is bit wise 'and' where as && is logical 'and'. Thanks to the comments about the forgotten shift.

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+1, that's the way to go if a specific binary representation is required (i.e. no LSB/MSB confusion). –  Pavel Minaev Oct 6 '09 at 0:25
3  
Don't forget to shift! –  Polaris878 Oct 6 '09 at 0:58
1  
As pointed out by Polaris878, the last 3 assignments will set '0' into the array, since you haven't used ">>" on the values. –  Richard Corden Oct 6 '09 at 9:11
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You can also use placement new for this:

void foo (int i) {
  char * c = new (&i) char[sizeof(i)];
}
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union value {
   int i;
   char bytes[sizof(int)];
};

value v;
v.i = 2;

char* bytes = v.bytes;
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Adding some explanation to your answer helps understand reader. –  Suraj Bajaj Dec 8 '12 at 19:32
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    #include <stdint.h>

    int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
        /* 8 ints in a loop */
        int i;
        int* intPtr
        int intArr[8] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8};
        char* charArr = malloc(32);

        for (i = 0; i < 8; i++) {
            intPtr = (int*) &(charArr[i * 4]);
          /*  ^            ^    ^        ^     */
          /* point at      |    |        |     */
          /*       cast as int* |        |     */
          /*               Address of    |     */
          /*            Location in char array */

            *intPtr = intArr[i]; /* write int at location pointed to */
        }

        /* Read ints out */
        for (i = 0; i < 8; i++) {
            intPtr = (int*) &(charArr[i * 4]);
            intArr[i] = *intPtr;
        }

        char* myArr = malloc(13);
        int myInt;
        uint8_t* p8;    /* unsigned 8-bit integer  */
        uint16_t* p16;  /* unsigned 16-bit integer */
        uint32_t* p32;  /* unsigned 32-bit integer */

        /* Using sizes other than 4-byte ints, */
        /* set all bits in myArr to 1          */
        p8 = (uint8_t*) &(myArr[0]);
        p16 = (uint16_t*) &(myArr[1]);
        p32 = (uint32_t*) &(myArr[5]);
        *p8 = 255;
        *p16 = 65535;
        *p32 = 4294967295;

        /* Get the values back out */
        p16 = (uint16_t*) &(myArr[1]);
        uint16_t my16 = *p16;

        /* Put the 16 bit int into a regular int */
        myInt = (int) my16;

    }

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