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I have a directory that contains a large number of text files (typically named rt??????.MON). Each file contains results in the format

#        HEADER INFO
#        ...
#
# --- TIME SERIES ---
#       TIME     Var1     Var 2     ...
#        [s]     [kg]     [kg]      ...
#          1       2        3       ...  
  0.0000E+00  1.0000E+00  1.0000E+00  ...
  6.4619E+00  2.0000E+00  2.0000E+00  ...
  6.4619E+00  2.5000E+00  2.5000E+00  ...
  8.9690E+00  3.0000E+00  3.0000E+00 ...
  ...

I'm trying to write a BASH script that will read down each file and remove lines with duplicate times (this is caused by rounding). So for the example above the output would be

#        HEADER INFO
#        ...
#
# --- TIME SERIES ---
#       TIME     Var1     Var 2     ...
#        [s]     [kg]     [kg]      ...
#          1       2        3       ...  
  0.0000E+00  1.0000E+00  1.0000E+00  ...
  6.4619E+00  2.0000E+00  2.0000E+00  ...
  8.9690E+00  3.0000E+00  3.0000E+00 ...

Bit of a newbie at BASH so any pointers would be gratefully received!

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What is the delimiter for the file? Tab? –  squiguy Mar 5 '13 at 17:24
    
The files are space deliminated. –  Chris Coffey Mar 5 '13 at 17:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

try this one-liner:

awk '$1!~/^#/&&$1 in a{next;}{a[$1]}1' file 
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Thanks. This one worked for me. Though I haven't had chance to test the other solutions which could be as good. I can see I'm going to have to spend sometime to learn awk. –  Chris Coffey Mar 10 '13 at 18:16

If the same times are adjacent (ie. in following lines) you can use just uniq. uniq has parameters to specify where to start comparing with the previous line, and how many chars you have to check (at least the GNU one). In the case, as it seems, that the numbers start and end at a fixed character you can write something like:

uniq --skip-chars=2 --check-chars=10 infile > outfile

outfile will hold different lines as of this set of characters.

As sudo_O comments, this solution may interfere with the header part of the file. I usually prefer having the files with just the data, and adding the header afterwards, or filtering the file before using grep or other tool to get just the lines of data, and then add the header part.

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I almost like this answer.. however OP doesn't state duplicates are adjacent and this could remove lines in the header section for example, as OP omitted lines from the input. –  iiSeymour Mar 5 '13 at 18:00
    
Mmm... you're right about the header part. This is why it should be removed for processing by some kind of filtering (grep?) and added latter, for homogeneity and ease of processing. Also, as the numbers specify times (as per OP question), and are in increasing order, I think you can suppose they're adjacent. –  Diego Sevilla Mar 5 '13 at 18:04

Awk is perfect for this:

$ awk '$1~/^[0-9].[0-9]{4}E[+-][0-9]{2}$/{if(!a[$1]++)print;next}1' file
#        HEADER INFO
#        ...
#
# --- TIME SERIES ---
#       TIME     Var1     Var 2     ...
#        [s]     [kg]     [kg]      ...
#          1       2        3       ...
  0.0000E+00  1.0000E+00  1.0000E+00  ...
  6.4619E+00  2.0000E+00  2.0000E+00  ...
  8.9690E+00  3.0000E+00  3.0000E+00 ...
  ...

Using a strict regexp comparison like this will ensure only the duplicates you want will be removed and the advantage of awk is the duplicate times don't have to be adjacent like with uniq.

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Another one you could try:

awk '/^#/ || !A[$1]++' file
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