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I have some piece of code in which I want to use a decorator on a classmethod as follows:

import functools

def mydeco(function):
    @classmethod
    def wrapper(cls):
        return function(cls) 
    return functools.update_wrapper(wrapper, function)
    # return wrapper

class BaseClass(object):
    @classmethod
    @mydeco
    def foo(cls):
        return "42" 

print BaseClass.foo()

When I comment out the line @mydeco the code works, i.e. the text 42 is printed. When including this decorator I have several problems:

  • When using the simpler line return wrapper I get the error

    TypeError: 'classmethod' object is not callable
    

How to do it right, i.e. that, in the given example, the original function is returned without being altered.

  • When using the more complex call return functools.update_wrapper(wrapper, function) to preserve some of the original function attributed I get the error

    AttributeError: 'classmethod' object has no attribute '__module__'
    

I am not sure if this error is related to the first issue, but it looks a different issue to me. Any specific suggestions to solve these issues are welcome.

The above example does not really 'do' something, it is merely the smallest possible example to show the problem I have.

share|improve this question
    
What exactly are you trying to do here? What output are you hoping to achieve? –  PurityLake Mar 5 '13 at 18:47
    
Just the same output. The example does not really 'do' something yet, I just want to get it to run (so I can actually 'do' something). –  Alex Mar 5 '13 at 18:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Is there a reason this will not work for you?

import functools

def mydeco(function):
    def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
        return function(*args, **kwargs) 
    return functools.update_wrapper(wrapper, function)

class BaseClass(object):
    @classmethod
    @mydeco
    def foo(cls):
        return "42" 

print BaseClass.foo()
42
share|improve this answer
    
This finally seems to work. Interesting to note the order of the decorators are of importance. –  Alex Mar 6 '13 at 7:30

Just saw an interesting post on decorators, here's the explanation but it doesn't provide a work around.

when the decorator is applied around @classmethod or @staticmethod, it can fail with an exception. This is because the wrappers created by these, do not have some of the attributes being copied.

I neither know how to correctly decorate a static/class method, but when I encounter similar exceptions I'll do one of the following just to get my code working without any insight:

  • change order of @mydeco and @staticmethod
  • discard @staticmethod

update

Here's another great post on how to correctly implement descriptors

share|improve this answer

Maybe the problem is in the @classmethod before def wrapper... (as mydeco is a function definition not a class definition)

share|improve this answer
    
Your answer is not really helpful, as it does not fix my problem. I can see your concern, but I know for sure that it works this way (in a bigger context impossible to post here). –  Alex Mar 5 '13 at 18:47
    
So, you don't post an idea of "your bigger context", I try to help you and I get a '-1'? Ok, man. Anyway, use "@classmethod" on a "method" of a "class", please. Take a look at "cmd"'s response. He/She also removes "@classmethod" before "def wrapper...", as I pointed at before. –  Paco Barter Mar 6 '13 at 23:13
from functools import wraps

def mydeco(function):
    @wraps(function)
    def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
        print "Calling Decorated Function"
        return function(*args, **kwargs) 
    #return functools.update_wrapper(wrapper(function), function)
    return wrapper


@mydeco
class BaseClass():
    def foo(self, cls):
        return "42" 

a = BaseClass()
print a.foo(22)

it works now

share|improve this answer
    
This is not a correct answer. The function foo has to be a classmethod which is not the case in your example. And the decorator has to be ONLY on foo, not the whole class. Also, does this implementation perserve function attributes, as with update_wrapper? –  Alex Mar 5 '13 at 19:42

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