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Problem: Program flow is not going to the child class implementation of ValidateDynData when I call ValidateDynData in my parent class.

I create my instance of my class using reflection. When I invoke a method in the child class from another project, it winds up in the correct method in the child class (and not parent's same-name method), so it seems like that is set up correctly.

This is what the reflection part looks like in my other project/class:

**Note 3/7/2013: I added more info so you can get the general feel for this. It gets the number of boxes, loops thru the number of boxes, and for each box, creates a control and adds a tab to the form. This is the main CTool visual studio project and is a class in the project, which is a form. When I press a button on the form, with the info (selected) on which child class I'm going to be creating later, it goes to this method , CreatTabs():

        cb = new CB();
        int errValue = cb.FindUsbHid(ref HWndBoxID); //see how many boxes there are
        if (errValue == 0 && HWndBoxID[0, 1] != 0)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < cb.cbInfos.Length; i++)
            {

                if (controls[i] == null)
                {
                    CB cb1 = new CB(); //need one for each box found or concurrent programming will fail
                    errValue = cb1.FindUsbHid(ref HWndBoxID); //need to do for each box to get all info
                    /////////////////////////////////////////
                    if (errValue == 0)
                    {
                       _assembly = Assembly.LoadFrom(programDll);
                       _type = _assembly.GetType("CrWriter.PC");
                       _objectInstance = Activator.CreateInstance(_type);
                       _parameters = new Object[] { cb1, programDll, templateArr, itsDll, cert, i, cb1.cbInfos[i].boxID };
                       controls[i] = new Control();
                       //The following lands in my child's GetPC method
                       //My parent also has a method called GetPC and that is called from the child. 
                       //Then, most of the program flow is in the parent until I need to call ValidateDynData,
                       //discussed below
                       controls[i] = (Control)_type.InvokeMember("GetPC", BindingFlags.Default | BindingFlags.InvokeMethod, null, _objectInstance, _parameters);

                       controls[i].Dock = DockStyle.None;
                       this.Controls.Add(controls[i]); 
                       TabPage newPage = new TabPage(string.Format("{0}:{1}", cb1.cbInfos[i].usbHandle, cb1.cbInfos[i].boxID));
                        Console.WriteLine("frmUserForm::CreateTabs - Making new tab with cb.cbInfos[i].usbHandle:" + cb1.cbInfos[i].usbHandle + " and cb.cbInfos[i].boxID:" + cb1.cbInfos[i].boxID);
                        InitializeControls(controls[i]);
                        tabCtrlMain.Size = controls[i].Size;
                        tabCtrlMain.Width += 20;
                        tabCtrlMain.Height += 100;
                        this.Width = tabCtrlMain.Width + 20;
                        this.Height = tabCtrlMain.Height + 50;
                        newPage.Controls.Add(controls[i]);
                        tabCtrlMain.TabPages.Add(newPage);
                     } //no err for this cb
                 } //controls not null
             } //for all cbInfo's
          }//if no err in general finding out how many cb's
          this.ResumeLayout();
          }

Since my Invocation of GetPC lands in the child class and not the parent, it must be created correctly. So I'm not sure why it's not landing in the correct ValidateDynData method. Maybe I need to cast my object to the programDll somehow. When I run the program and inspect the _objectInstance it could be a problem: variable..................................................value

base: {GenericCrWriter.GenericPC} ......CrWriter.PC

baseInst: ................................................GenericCrWriter.GenericPC

But then, the _assembly is referring to Ko/PC and not Generic/GenericPC.

Also, my _assembly.GetType looks good. My Generic/parent doesn't have anything named CrWriter.PC

I'm trying to use the child class method instead of the parent class for some child class cases. For some reason, I get to the parent class method, but it never gets to the override in the child. Any ideas why? I've been referring to Calling child class method from parent but it's not getting to the child's method.

In my PC.cs of the child class (Ko):

**Note 3/8/2013: PC.cs is in the Ko visual studio project. **this contains a form that is displayed **Note 3/7/2013: This is a separate visual studio project named after the child, let's call it Ko. The important class here is PC.cs. It doesn't do much except pass data to the parent, provide it's custom textBoxes and their names, validate data entered later in the parent's form. Most of the flow is in the parent, otherwise. I'm adding GetPC, setProgramName, setDTF methods.

    public partial class PC : GenericPC
    {
      String childDllName = "";  //I just added this recently but it doesn't seem useful
      GenericPC baseInst = new GenericPC();
      public Control GetPC(USB_Comm.CB cbInst, string dllSel, TemplateHApp.Templates.TEMPL[] templ, string dll, SC.SC.SITE c0, int slaveIndex, int BoxID)
       {
           childDllName = dll;
           //call parent class methods  
           setProgramName();
           setDTF();
           ProcessDynData();
           return baseInst.GetPC(cbInst, dllSel, templ, dll, cert0, slaveIndex, BoxID);
       }


       public void setProgramName()
       {
           Console.WriteLine("Ko  did stuff");
           //Update label on form
           var f = new F(); //F is a class in child class containing more info on it
           string temp = f.GetProgramName();
           baseInst.setProgramName(temp); //this is displayed on parent's form
       }

       public void setDTF()
       {
           var f = new F();
           string temp = f.DTF();
           baseInst.setDTF(temp);  //this is displayed on parent's form
       }

       private void ProcessDynamicData()
       {
           Console.WriteLine("Ko PC::ProcessDynamicData");
           Label lbl_dynData0 = new Label();
           Label lbl_dynData1 = new Label();
           lbl_dynData0.Text = "AT  .";
           lbl_dynData1.Text = "VL   .";
           lbl_dynData0.Location = new Point(57, 25);
           lbl_dynData1.Location = new Point(57, 45);
           Label[] lbl_dynData_Arr = new Label[4];
           lbl_dynData_Arr[0] = lbl_dynData0;
           lbl_dynData_Arr[1] = lbl_dynData1;
           TextBox tb_dynData0 = new TextBox();
           TextBox tb_dynData1 = new TextBox();
           tb_dynData0.Location = new Point(67, 25);
           tb_dynData1.Location = new Point(67, 45);
           tb_dynData0.Size = new Size(151,22);
           tb_dynData1.Size = new Size(151, 22);
           TextBox[] tb_dynData_Array = new TextBox[4];
           tb_dynData_Array[0] = tb_dynData0;
           tb_dynData_Array[1] = tb_dynData1;
           PC pc = this;  //Tried adding this to get past problem but it's not turned out useful
           //I think the way I access parent class from child is the problem of why flow in 
           //parent class isn't reaching overridden method in child when called:
           baseInst.addDynamicDataTextBoxes(tb_dynData_Array, lbl_dynData_Arr, childDllName, pc);
       }

       public override void ValidateDynData(TextBox[] tb_dynData_Array, ref int result)
       { //I added more info here, but it's probably too much info 3/7/2013
          Console.WriteLine("Ko PC::ValidateDynData");
          result = -610; 
          //AT
          if ((Convert.ToInt16(tb_dynData_Array[0].Text) >= 1) && (Convert.ToInt16(tb_dynData_Array[0].Text) <= 99))
              result = 0;

          //VL
          if (result == 0) 
            if ((Convert.ToInt16(tb_dynData_Array[1].Text) >= 69) && (Convert.ToInt16(tb_dynData_Array[1].Text) <= 100))
                result = 0;
            else
                result = -610;
        }  

In my GenericPC.cs of the parent class:

**Note 3/8/2013: GenericPC is in the Generic visual studio project. **Note 3/7/2013 When the child class calls the parent class to initialize important data, the parent class shows it's form and fields (I think resume layout shows it). Next, we enter data on the form, including Ko's custom data, then we hit a button on the form (btn_Lock_Config_Click) and it needs to process and validate it's data. I added more methods to get the feel for flow. There are a ton more methods in parent than child (not shown), including try/catch, etc.

    //base
    public partial class GenericPC : UserControl
    {
    //class variables (wave your hands..too much info)

     public Control GetPC(USB_Comm.CB cbInstance, string dllSelected, TemplateHApp.Templates.TEMPL[] template, string dll, SC.SC.SITE c0, int slaveIndex, int boxID)
    {
        cb = cbInstance;
        SlaveIndex = slaveIndex;
        createControls();
        itsDll = dll;
        templateArr = template;
        return this; //return the control for the control array
    }    

    //called from child class
    public void setProgramName(string name)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Generic setProgramName slaveIndex:" + SlaveIndex);
        lbl_Program_Name.Text = name;
    }

    //called from child class
    public void setDTF(string theDTF)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Generic setDTF slaveIndex:" + SlaveIndex);
        lbl_Program_Name.Text += " ";
        lbl_Program_Name.Text += theDTF;
        lbl_Program_Name.Refresh();
    }

    public void addDynamicDataTextBoxes(TextBox [] tb_dynData, Label [] lblTitle, String childName, Object child)
    { 
        childHasDynamicData = true; //somebody's knocking
        itsChildName = childName; //child name isn't turning out to be useful here
        itsChild = child; //child isn't turning out to be useful here
        Console.WriteLine("Generic addDynamicDataTextBoxes slaveIndex:" + SlaveIndex);
        //Display what child wants
        for (int i = 0; i < tb_dynData.Length; i++)
        {
            //assumes calling code knows real estate and planned for it
            gb_dynamicData.Controls.Add(lblTitle[i]);
            gb_dynamicData.Controls.Add(tb_dynData[i]);
        }
        itsEnteredDynamicData = tb_dynData; //nothing entered yet
    }

    private void btn_Lock_Config_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        int status = 1;
        Console.WriteLine("Generic btn_Lock slaveIndex:" + SlaveIndex);
        //it does some flagging and data checking, etc.
        status = processDynamicData();
    }

    private int processDynData()
    {
        int returnCode = 0;  //I'm setting it to desired value for example
        //processes data, puts it into data arrays, etc, 
        if ((returnCode >= 0) && childHasDynamicData)
            ValidateDynData(itsEnteredDynamicData, ref returnCode);
           //start here for problem...it never calls child method, as intended
    }

    public virtual void ValidateDynData(TextBox[] tb_dynData_Array, ref int result)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Generic::ValidateDynData passing off to child to validate special data");
    } 

Any ideas why it's not going to the child class implementation of ValidateDynData when I call ValidateDynData in my parent class? This is the only area in my code where I am trying to have a child class override a parent implementation, so I'm not sure if I'm doing something wrong?

I checked the correct version of Generic.dll is referenced in the child's project/class. I did a clean build in the child class. Any other binaries that should be checked? Is there something wrong with my reflection? Is there something wrong with my virtual/override use for ValidateDynData?

Update: I've been looking at the code some more, and I get flow into the parent class by creating an instance of the parent/base class. So I think that's why I'm not getting into ValidateDynData that is overridden in the child class when I call it in parent. Is there another way to get to the parent's method without creating an instance of the parent?

    GenericPC baseInst = new GenericPC(); 
    return baseInst.GetPC(cbInst, dllSel, templ, dll, cert0, slaveIndex, BoxID); 

**Update 3/7/13: It's also possible that the problem is that I press a button on the parent's form which starts a new thread and by doing this, it doesn't know about child class, so that's why flow doesn't get to child when I call ValidateDynData method.

share|improve this question
    
Please show a complete example including full class declarations, distribution among projects / assemblies, and the complete code invoking those methods. However, please keep the example as small and compact as possible, do not include code which doesn't relate to your problem. –  Ondrej Tucny Mar 5 '13 at 18:51
1  
not sure if this is related, but processDynData() as written will not compile, because it needs a returned int. Is it possible that you are running an older compiled version? –  David Hope Mar 5 '13 at 18:54
1  
I reimplemented this (in a simplified form) and it works as expected (the child PC class is called for ValidateDynData). The simplifications were: 1. eliminated the partial class 2. simplified the parameters for GetPC and ValidateDynData. Without anything else to work for, I'm still guessing as above, that you are running an older version of the assembly containing the PC and GenericPC classes –  David Hope Mar 5 '13 at 18:57
    
I've been looking at the code some more, and I get flow into the parent class by creating an instance of the parent/base class. So I think that's why I'm not getting into ValidateDynData that is overridden in the child class when I call it in parent. Is there another way to get to the parent's method without creating an instance of the parent? GenericPC baseInst = new GenericPC(); return baseInst.GetPC(cbInst, dllSel, templ, dll, cert0, slaveIndex, BoxID); –  Michele Mar 5 '13 at 20:28
1  
@Michele is there anyway to remove large parts of the code and still generate the issue? –  David Hope Mar 5 '13 at 20:54

1 Answer 1

Short answer: Just delete all that awful code and start over.

Longer answer:

// (1)
public partial class PC : GenericPC
{
    // (2)
    GenericPC baseInst = new GenericPC();

    public Control GetPC(…)
    {
        …
        // (3)
        return baseInst.GetPC(cbInst, dllSel, templ, dll, cert0, slaveIndex, BoxID);
    }

    public override void ValidateDynData(TextBox[] tb_dynData_Array, ref int result)
    {
        // (4)
        …
    }
}

Comments to marked lines of code:

  1. At this point you declare PC as a descendant of GenericPC. So far so good.
  2. Here you declare and instantiate a completely disparate instance of GenericPC which has nothing to do with the instance of PC you are working with.
  3. You call GetPC, a method of an instance of PC, which in turns call GetPC in that completely disparate instance of GenericPC; nothing in common with the original PC instance!
  4. Finally, you expect control flow to end up the original PC instance; but that won't ever happen when, effectively, you all the time call methods of some silly GenericPC instance!

My recommendation is reading a book about object-oriented programming, that provides samples in C#. It seems you are even missing the point of inheritance, one of the basic concepts in OOP.


To fix it, you need to remove the declaration of baseInst, and replace all calls to baseInst's methods with the base keyword. Then your code will actually call methods declared in the ancestor class within the same instance. Also most methods shall be declared as virtual in GenericPC and you have to override them in PC.

public partial class PC : GenericPC
{
    public override Control GetPC(…)
    {
        …
        return base.GetPC(cbInst, dllSel, templ, dll, cert0, slaveIndex, BoxID);
    }

    public override void ValidateDynData(TextBox[] tb_dynData_Array, ref int result)
    {
        …
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for verifying what I suspected...that I was having issues with not using the child when I thought I was. I was looking into it further, and even though I am using reflection to invoke the child class, which also brings up a form which is part of the parent class, when I press a button on the form, it is actually running a thread that is the parent and not the child. That's another issue. –  Michele Mar 9 '13 at 21:07
    
I'm planning on re-designing this and have the reflection invoke the parent class directly, and create an instance of the child class there. I'm going to figure out how to create a control in the child class and put it in the parent's form. So, when someone enters data on the child's part of the form, the child's methods can validate the data without having to go through the parent. Even if I had to go through the parent to get to the child's method at that point, I would have an instance of the child at that point and it would be easier to access. –  Michele Mar 9 '13 at 21:08
    
I realize I'm having issues with the design and OOP. I have a lot of experience with a large 2000+ class baseline of legacy C++ code, over 10 years old, where we were using existing designs over and over again...add a motor similar to other motors, etc. So I can understand why this is something for me to work on. –  Michele Mar 9 '13 at 21:08
1  
I'm not sure what kind of answer you are looking for. I tried extending my answer with a proposed fix. Nevertheless, you shall familiarize yourself with basic principles of OOP. –  Ondrej Tucny Mar 11 '13 at 10:47
    
So if I use the base keyword instead of my instance of the parent class, when the thread is in the parent class, and I call ValidateDynData, you think it will go to the child's ValidateDynData? Also, if I press a button on the form that the parent is displaying, do you think it would know about the child class? I'm not so sure. When I inspected "this" after pressing a button on the parent's form, it was the parent and not the child thread. Not that I made the change you suggested above yet.... But do you think that change would help @Ondrej Tucny? –  Michele Mar 12 '13 at 12:29

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