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I'm working on manipulating a product data feed, and am currently working on grouping the related products. I've almost got things where I want them, but, like a mediocre racing driver, I've run out of skill right when I need it the most.

To illustrate my problem I've created a simplified version. Here is the data structure:

CREATE TABLE `feed` (
    `sku` VARCHAR(10),
    `price` DECIMAL(6,2),
    `groupkey` VARCHAR(10)
  );

INSERT INTO `feed` (`sku`, `price`, `groupkey`) VALUES
('AAA', 10.00, NULL),
('BBB', 10.00, 'group1'),
('CCC', 12.00, 'group1'),
('DDD', 10.00, 'group2'),
('EEE', 12.00, 'group2'),
('FFF', 14.00, 'group2'),
('GGG', 20.00, NULL);

My current query is:

SELECT feed.groupkey
    , group_concat(feed.sku) AS skus
    , group_concat(feed.price) AS prices
    , feed.price AS pprice
FROM
    feed
WHERE
    feed.groupkey IS NOT NULL
GROUP BY
    feed.groupkey;

The query returns the following rows:

+----------+-------------+-------------------+--------+
| groupkey | skus        | prices            | pprice |
+----------+-------------+-------------------+--------+
| group1   | BBB,CCC     | 10.00,12.00       |  10.00 |
| group2   | DDD,EEE,FFF | 10.00,12.00,14.00 |  10.00 |
+----------+-------------+-------------------+--------+

What I actually need to do is subtract pprice from each concatenated price, giving me the price difference between each sku, rather than their absolute prices. This would return the dream result:

+----------+-------------+-------------------+--------+
| groupkey | skus        | prices            | pprice |
+----------+-------------+-------------------+--------+
| group1   | BBB,CCC     | 0.00,2.00         |  10.00 |
| group2   | DDD,EEE,FFF | 0.00,2.00,4.00    |  10.00 |
+----------+-------------+-------------------+--------+

I've spent a lot of time on this feed in general, and am really stuck on what is probably the last hurdle in the integration. I'd really appreciate some guidance to help me in the right direction.

edit: I'm using the results from this query as "virtual" product rows, to serve as parents for the products in the group.

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Make the substraction before applying GROUP_CONCAT (or inside the GROUP_CONCAT() –  Barranka Mar 5 '13 at 19:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can just do the subtraction in the group_concat(), for something like:

SELECT feed.groupkey, group_concat(feed.sku) AS skus,
       group_concat(feed.price - min(feed.price)) AS prices
       min(feed.price) AS pprice
FROM feed
WHERE feed.groupkey IS NOT NULL
GROUP BY feed.groupkey

The problem is . . . which feed.price? The value returned in your original query is an arbitrary value from one of the rows in the group. Thinking that you might want the difference over the minimum, I used that value.

I think the best way to write the query is:

SELECT feed.groupkey, group_concat(feed.sku) AS skus,
       group_concat(feed.price - fsum.minprice) AS prices
       min(feed.price) AS pprice
FROM feed left outer join
     (select groupkey, MIN(feed.price) as minprice
      from feed
      group by groupkey
     ) fsum
     on feed.groupkey = fsum.groupkey
WHERE feed.groupkey IS NOT NULL
GROUP BY feed.groupkey

You CANNOT assume the ordering for hidden columns and group_concat(). The documentation is quite explicit on this point:

MySQL extends the use of GROUP BY so that the select list can refer to nonaggregated columns not named in the GROUP BY clause. This means that the preceding query is legal in MySQL. You can use this feature to get better performance by avoiding unnecessary column sorting and grouping. However, this is useful primarily when all values in each nonaggregated column not named in the GROUP BY are the same for each group. The server is free to choose any value from each group, so unless they are the same, the values chosen are indeterminate. Furthermore, the selection of values from each group cannot be influenced by adding an ORDER BY clause. Sorting of the result set occurs after values have been chosen, and ORDER BY does not affect which values the server chooses.

If you want things in a particular order, then you need to be sure the structure is queried properly. That said, it often works in practice, but there is no guarantee.

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I'm using the results from this query as "virtual" product rows, to serve as parents for the products in the group. The data is already in price order before this stage, so I can safely assume that the first result in the GROUP BY also has the lowest price. –  riplash Mar 5 '13 at 19:16
    
I appreciate you expanding upon your answer, I probably would have encountered the ordering problem next, so am grateful for your taking it into account. I'm currently trying to get your suggestion to work for me ("invalid use of group function") - I'll continue to prod it and report back when I've got it working. –  riplash Mar 5 '13 at 19:25
    
Thanks again, works great for the example in my post. Having ordering issues when I apply it to the wider feed - some values in the prices column are shown as negative numbers. I'll try and get there using this as a start point. –  riplash Mar 5 '13 at 20:08
    
+1 when I have the ability to give it. This ended up being a major part of the solution, and was used almost exactly as suggested. Really do appreciate your help. –  riplash Mar 6 '13 at 3:49

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