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Here's an example style supported by most browsers:

.class {
     background: rgba(0,0,0,0.3);
 }

Old IE (IE 6-8) don't support rgba. There are at least three methods I could potentially use to support this.

  1. Same class

    .class {
         background: grey;
         background: rgba(0,0,0,0.3);
    }
    
  2. Modernizr

    .class {
         background: rgba(0,0,0,0.3);
    }
    
    .no-rgba .class {
         background: grey;
    }
    
  3. star hacks

    .class {
         background: rgba(0,0,0,0.3);
         background: grey\9; /*IE8 and below*/
     }
    

I prefer to use methods 1 and 2 because they cover more than just IE browsers, but I'm not sure which method I should use.

Method 1 is good because it works even if JS is disabled. However, there's an extra attribute to render for all modern browsers.

Method 2 is good because it segregates the bad browsers into their own classes. Modern browsers won't render this class which saves milliseconds of rendering time.

Maybe there's something else I'm not thinking of that could be better? I'd like to avoid using PIE.htc or filters. What is the best method for optimization and load time?

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"saves milliseconds of rendering time". I'd say less than that even. Go with #1. –  Diodeus Mar 5 '13 at 19:08
    
I usually do go with #1 but I'm curious to see if anyone has insight why another method would be better. Thanks for the feedback! –  micah Mar 5 '13 at 19:14
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For this kind of style, the correct answer is the first one you listed:

.class {
     background: grey;
     background: rgba(0,0,0,0.3);
}

Specify the fall-back options first, followed by the preferred option.

IE will set the background to grey because it doesn't support rgba; other browsers will use the rgba version as intended.

The reasons this is the best answer are:

  1. It is the canonical "correct" answer for this exact scenario: CSS was designed to work this way, with exactly this kind of situation in mind.

  2. It is the least expensive option, because no browser has to do any extra rendering or scripting. IE will completely ignore the second background, so nothing extra happens there; other browsers will parse both, but parsing the second will overwrite what has been parsed for the first, so the only overhead is the parsing, which would have to be done anyway for whichever option you pick.

Of the other possible solutions, Modernizr is great, but is overkill for this scenario -- if you have a solution that doesn't involve any scripting, there's no need to use a scripted solution. And the CSS hacks should be avoided at all costs. There may be cases where they are worth using, but I personally haven't seen a legitimate use for one since I stopped trying to support IE6.

The other solution that is available but which you didn't mention is conditional comments: ie use IE's <!--[if IE]> syntax to load an alternative stylesheet for IE. However I would avoid this as well if possible, and again, the need for this kind of solution is fading away as IE6 and IE7 become more distant memories.

Finally, a slightly different option for you: Just ignore old IE. For some things, IE8 may not render things the way you want, and it's a pain to make it do so. In these cases, it is a perfectly legitimate strategy to just let it fail. For the example in the question, this isn't necessary, as we have a perfectly good CSS solution, but for other more complex styles, consider how bad the site will look if IE doesn't get things right; if it's still usable, then there may be a case for simply letting it slide. This option needs to be weighed against the number of users that will be affected and how much of a problem it causes for them, and also the requirements you're working to, but it should be considered as an option.

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Your method #1 is the generally accepted way, because not only does it handle IE, but it also handles any browser that doesn't support the CSS in question (in this case, RGBA). The rule for CSS that browsers are supposed to follow is that if they don't recognize a line, they ignore it and move on. As for more capable browsers, CSS such as this is cheap, and the browser may not even render the fallback CSS at all (I know most don't download the image for image-based fallbacks).

Method 2 not only adds classes (which add weight), but adds an entire JavaScript library. If you're dealing with a bunch of other CSS3 type stuff (especially things that don't have such easy fallbacks), then it's not a big deal, but if you're using to handle fallbacks such as these, or just one or two, then you're adding a lot of overhead (including potentially another HTTP request) for not a lot of extra benefit. Even if the modern browsers don't render the classes, they do have to run the JavaScript to check for the capability.

Method 3 is a hack and should be avoided whenever possible (I recommend conditional stylesheets over resorting to hacks). Not only does it target only specific versions of a specific browser (thus leaving all the other browsers that don't support this CSS out in the cold), but relies on bugs in a browser to get the job done. And what happens if that code triggers a different bug in a different browser, or if a browser recognizes the line with the hack, but also behaves properly with the correct CSS? Have a look at some of the tutorials circa 2005, when IE6 and IE5 for Mac were still major contenders, and see the crazy lengths people went to with browser hacks to keep them from stepping on each others' toes. (Note: I do not consider prefixed CSS to be hacks. Prefixed CSS items are documented functionality that the browser vendors chose to add and serve the stated purpose of sandboxing those features. If they are for things that make it into the standard, then they are designed to be phased out over time.)

So, in order of preference - Fallback CSS, Modernizr, Conditional Stylesheets, Browser Hacks.

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Excellent feedback, thanks. I should specify for method #2, I wouldn't just keep the default Modernizr for production. I'd only include the methods actually being used in CSS/JS but also include it for HTML5 support for old IE browsers. –  micah Mar 5 '13 at 19:53
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