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Im trying to reduce the number of HTTP calls by using sprite image in my project. So the structure goes like this:

<div class="parent">
  <div class="child-1">Content here</div>
  <div class="child-2">Content here</div>
</div>

<div class="outsider">
Content here
</div>

I have one single sprite that has 3 images -- each for 2 child classes of parent and last one for 'outsider' class.

I could try giving CSS like this:

.parent{
  background-image: url("../img/4-in-one-sprite.png");
}
.child-1{
  background-position: 0px -10px;
  width: 10px;
}
.child-2{
  background-position: 0px -20px;
  width: 10px;
}
.outsider{
  background-position: 0px -30px;
  width: 10px;
}

Since outsider does not belong to parent, it wont get that background, right? So I will have to re-specify same background image in its class definition also, like this:

.outsider{
  background-image: url("../img/4-in-one-sprite.png");
  background-position: 0px -30px;
  width: 10px;
}

My doubts are:

  1. Wont browser make an extra image request for outsider class? Imagine the image is not getting cached and its the very first loading of that page.

  2. Or will the the browser somehow intelligently understand its the same resource and make only 1 call altogether?

  3. When we give background images, at what stage of rendering the page, does the browser request for the resource? Is it while parsing the css or while painting them onto the dom?

  4. What is the best way to use sprite here and reduce http call to bare minimum without putting 3rd image as separate?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

background-position only applies to the background-image of the element, that's not something that is inherited (you don't have to add background: none on each children to stop cascading and having the same background over and over with parent, child, grand-child elements isn't it?).

So you've got 3 occurences of background-image here, one for outsider, one for child-1 and one for each child-2 (you've got a typo with the latter). And 3 different pairs of values for position.

Browsers will only request once each unique resource, don't worry but the order of CSS, JS, images, defer, async, etc resource loading may vary. Err does vary in fact.

The best way to use sprites is knowing when not to use them: do not use them when you should use an HTML image with an alt attibute.

Finally, you lack one important property: background-repeat. No sprite for repeating ones (you'd see all the sprites at once). 3 different sprites for no-repeat, repeat-y and repeat-x ones are necessary.

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So it should be okey if I give background-image to outsider class to use the same image -- browser wont make an extra call. Is it? –  goose Mar 5 '13 at 19:48
    
That's what he said: "Browsers will only request once each unique resource" –  cimmanon Mar 5 '13 at 19:57

A quite nice way of doing this is to use the name "sprite" only on these elements..

And then use something like this in css:

[class^="sprite-"], [class*=" sprite-"] {
    background:transparent url("../img/4-in-one-sprite.png") no-repeat;
}

So, ".sprite-outsider" and ".sprite-child-1" would both get the sprite as a background, and only need the positioning on them..

Does not work in ie6, but how cares now-a-days? ;)

And, yes through this the browsers are smart!

share|improve this answer
    
Im sorry. I dont find defining class names based on the images they use, very appealing. –  goose Mar 5 '13 at 19:51
    
I don't think you understood the post. "based on the image they use"? If you have a sprite, it's messy css if you declare it more then once.. And you can name it whatever you want.. ;) –  erik Mar 6 '13 at 7:15

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