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I cannot see the added data in the data table this is the code:

I'm using Visual Studio 2010 Express.

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    string t1 = textBox1.Text;

    SqlCeConnection conn =
       new SqlCeConnection(@"Data Source=|DataDirectory|\Database1.sdf");

    conn.Open();

    SqlCeCommand cmdInsert = conn.CreateCommand();
    cmdInsert.CommandText = "INSERT TO table_name (Column1) VALUES (t1)";

    cmdInsert.ExecuteNonQuery();

    conn.Close();
}

It doesn't insert into data table after clicking on the button, it gives me an error on

cmdInsert.ExecuteNonQuery();

it debugs it, but when I click on the button, it shows me an error saying

SqlCeException was unhandled. There was an error parsing the query. [ Token line number = 1,Token line offset = 8,Token in error = TO ]

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Does the insert work when you run it in SSMS? –  Brian Mar 5 '13 at 19:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Try:

cmdInsert.Parameters.AddWithValue("@t1", textBox1.Text);
cmdInsert.CommandText = "insert INTO table_name (Column1) VALUES (@t1)";
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There are two problems with your code:

  • Syntax error in SQL statement - you should write INSERT INTO instead of INSERT TO.
  • You cannot use t1 directly in the SQL string. Although you could concatenate strings as suggested in other comments, it's better to use parametrized command instead.

Here is the corrected version:

SqlCeCommand cmdInsert = conn.CreateCommand();
cmdInsert.CommandText = "INSERT INTO table_name (Column1) VALUES (@t1)";
cmdInsert.Parameters.AddWithValue("@t1", t1);
cmdInsert.ExecuteNonQuery();

See Why do we need SqlCeCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue() to Insert a value? for more details on command parameters.

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Your sql query is wrong.

Instead of

cmdInsert.CommandText = "INSERT TO table_name (Column1) VALUES (t1)";

There should be

cmdInsert.CommandText = "INSERT INTO table_name (Column1) VALUES (t1)";
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The variable t1 still isn't reachable. It would need to be a parameterized query and a parameter would need added to the command like in the answer provided by @Andomar. –  Michael Perrenoud Mar 5 '13 at 19:39
string t1 = textBox1.Text;
            SqlCeConnection conn = new SqlCeConnection(@"Data Source=|DataDirectory|\Database1.sdf");
            conn.Open();
            SqlCeCommand cmdInsert = conn.CreateCommand();
            cmdInsert.CommandText = "INSERT into table_name (Column1) VALUES ('" + t1 + "')";
            cmdInsert.ExecuteNonQuery();
            conn.Close();
share|improve this answer
4  
This is a teaching moment for someone new to queries. We should not be telling the OP to not use a parameterized query. See Andromar's answer below. –  Brian Mar 5 '13 at 19:42
    
@Brian is it fine now? –  kashif Mar 5 '13 at 19:46
    
No. INSERT TO is the wrong syntax, isn't it? :) –  Brian Mar 5 '13 at 19:47
1  
The approach is flawed, and it introduces a Sql Injection Vulnerability. –  Michael Fredrickson Mar 5 '13 at 19:51
2  
I would still use: cmdInsert.Parameters.AddWithValue("@t1", textBox1.Text); cmdInsert.CommandText = "insert INTO table_name (Column1) VALUES (@t1)";. As Michael just mentioned, NOT using a parameterized query invites a SQL Injection attack. –  Brian Mar 5 '13 at 19:52

You need to pass the value of t1, probably with a parameter.

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    string t1 = textBox1.Text;
    SqlCeConnection conn =
       new SqlCeConnection(@"Data Source=|DataDirectory|\Database1.sdf");
    conn.Open();
    SqlCeCommand cmdInsert = conn.CreateCommand();
    cmdInsert.CommandText = "INSERT INTO table_name (Column1) VALUES (@t1)";
    var parameter = cmdInsert.CreateParameter();
    parameter.Value = t1;
    parameter.ParameterName = "@t1";

    cmdInsert.Parameters.Add(parameter);

    cmdInsert.ExecuteNonQuery();
    conn.Close();
}
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Sorry I didn't see that, I updated the answer. –  Shane Andrade Mar 5 '13 at 19:43

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