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class Myclass
{
    static string[] user_Name = { "admin", "user1", "user2" };
    static string[] user_Password ={ "admin", "123", "789" };

    public static void Check_Method(string u_name, string u_password)
    {

        for (int i = 0; i < user_Name.Length; i++)
        {
            if (u_name == user_Name[i] && u_password == user_Password[i])
            {
                MessageBox.Show("login successful");
                break;
            }
            else
            {
                if (i == (user_Name.Length - 1))
                    MessageBox.Show("Badshow");
            }
        }
    }
    public static void add_user(string name, string password)
    {
        i=user_Name.Length;
        user_Name[i]=name;
        user_Password[i]=password;
        //here i want to add another user but im unable to find the way
    }
}

But it gives an error that it is outside the boundary of an array.

What could be the most convenient way to perform this action?

share|improve this question
    
The reason for the array out of bounds error is that you are using the length of the user name as the index into your user_Name array. This isn't really the meat of the question but I thought you should know. –  Odrade Mar 5 '13 at 20:11
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5 Answers 5

Try using a List<>.

class Myclass
{
    static List<string> user_Name = new List<string>{ "admin", "user1", "user2" };
    static List<string> user_Password = new List<string>{ "admin", "123", "789" };

    public static void Check_Method(string u_name, string u_password)
    {

        for (int i = 0; i < user_Name.Length; i++)
        {
            if (u_name == user_Name[i] && u_password == user_Password[i])
            {
                MessageBox.Show("login successful");
                break;
            }
            else
            {
                if (i == (user_Name.Length - 1))
                    MessageBox.Show("Badshow");
            }
        }
    }
    public static void add_user(string name, string password)
    {
        user_Name.Add(name);
        user_Password.Add(password);
    }
}

Here's a refactored version:

Users are contained in a user class.

They are IEquatable<> which compares their username/passwords (you might want to consider looking into a Guid to keep them unique).

Easily add/remove users.

public class User : IEquatable<User>
{
    public User(string name, string password)
    {
        Name = name;
        Password = password;
    }

    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Password { get; set; }

    public bool Equals(User other)
    {
        if (other == null) return false;

        return other.Name == Name && other.Password == Password;
    }
}

public class AuthenticationManager
{
    private List<User> LoggedInUsers = new List<User>
    { new User("Admin", "admin"), new User ("user1", "123"), new User ("user2", "789") };

    public bool Authenticate(string userName, string password)
    {
        var user = new User(userName, password);

        //if the user is in the list it will return false otherwise true.
        return !LoggedInUsers.Any(u => user.Equals(user)); 
    }

    public void Login(string name, string password)
    {
        LoggedInUsers.Add(new User(name, password));
    }

    public void Logout(string name, string password)
    {
        LoggedInUsers.Remove(new User(name, password));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This would get out of hand pretty quickly. I'd always recommend that newcomers get to grips with OOP concepts ASAP. –  Mark Walsh Mar 5 '13 at 19:58
    
o great bro... thix ix also a better way –  Rehan Manzoor Mar 5 '13 at 20:00
    
@RummyKhan check my edit –  Romoku Mar 5 '13 at 20:07
    
@Romoku i was busy in paper.. thanx for the useful info.. –  Rehan Manzoor Mar 18 '13 at 11:33
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Try use List<string> class instead of string[]

and add items to array using object.Add() method

share|improve this answer
    
okay i will try it thanx for your comments –  Rehan Manzoor Mar 5 '13 at 20:01
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Why don't you use and List and apply a DTO instead of multiples string[] ?

Try something like this:

1) Create a DTO for your Users:

public class UserDTO
{
    public string UserName { get; set; }
    public string Password { get; set; }    
}

2) Use and List<DTO>

class Myclass
{
    static List<UserDTO> users = new List<UserDTO>()
    {
        new UserDTO() { UserName= "admin", Password = "admin" } ,
        new UserDTO() { UserName= "user1", Password = "123" } ,
        new UserDTO() { UserName= "user2", Password = "789" } ,
    }

    public static void Check_Method(string u_name, string u_password)
    {
        if (users.Exists(x => x.UserName == u_name && x.Password == u_password)
        {
               MessageBox.Show("login successful");
        }
        else
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Badshow");
        }
    }
    public static void add_user(string name, string password)
    {
        users.Add(new UserDTO() { UserName= name, Password = password });
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
great, and thanx for showing me the way –  Rehan Manzoor Mar 5 '13 at 19:59
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Okay I think you might be thinking about this the wrong way. The way in which you're using arrays is screaming out for an object.

I would made User an object like so

public class User 
{
  public string UserName { get; set;}
  public string Password { get; set;}
}

I would then maintain a list of Users instead. That way you won't need to maintain array indexes and you can easily add new users into the list.

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Don't use arrays if you need variable sized storage.

Use List<string> instead - it allows you to Add items.


In your case, your choice of two arrays is questionable, as each user has a corresponding password - always. This suggests that you should have a custom class to hold a user/password pair.

With such a class (say User), you would hold a List<User> and simplify your code.

share|improve this answer
2  
No; use a List<User> –  SLaks Mar 5 '13 at 19:51
    
@SLaks - Good point. –  Oded Mar 5 '13 at 19:53
    
thanx.. i will keep thix in mind –  Rehan Manzoor Mar 5 '13 at 19:57
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