Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to write a function that takes a character and a string as inputs, and then compares that character to each element in the string. It then prints an d finally returns the number of times that the said character appears in the string.

This is the code I've come up with, but it isn't working out the right way. I'd appreciate it if someone could explain and correct the error.

I thought first to write a function that compares two characters to check if they are equal, like this:

def func1(x1, x2):
    if x1 == x2:
        return True
    else:
        return False

And then, I thought I'd wite the other, main function like this:

def func2():
    ch1 = input("Enter one character. ")
    str1 = str(input("Enter a string. "))
    list_1 = list(str1)
    a = 0
    for 1 in list_1:
        if func1(ch1, list_1):
            a += 1
        else:
            a += 0
        print(a)
        return a

What is the error here? If I choose "a" as my character, and then enter a string of five a's as my string, the function still tells me that "a" appeared in the string only once. Why is this and how do I fix it?

share|improve this question
    
This may help you to solve the problem without your extra function - stackoverflow.com/questions/12877671/… The accepted answer has recursive and iterative ways to count the vowels in a given string. If you change the comparison to just check against one char rather than an string of vowels, you should be on the right track :) –  Josh Lowry Mar 5 '13 at 19:59
    
I really don't understand for why you wrote this function: def func1(x1, x2). Even if you want separate function for that you can write def func1(x1, x2): return x1 == x2 –  Denis Nikanorov Mar 5 '13 at 19:59
    
@DenisNikanorov that's fine, that is how every person who starts programming writes code, he will improve will time. But good to make that comment though –  Saher Mar 5 '13 at 20:05
    
@Saher, I hope) –  Denis Nikanorov Mar 5 '13 at 20:07
    
Thanks for the help. –  Ivan Lesiv Mar 5 '13 at 20:19
show 1 more comment

6 Answers 6

"YourString".count("Char") will do

share|improve this answer
add comment

Here is a simple code that does what you want:

It returns the number of times the character ch appears in text.

def test(ch, text): // ch is character and text is the string
    numAppears = 0
    for t in text:
        if t == ch:
            numAppears += 1
    return numAppears

example:

>>> test("a", "saherbaderahwal")
4
>>> test("c", "hello")
0
>>> test(" ", "nice to meet you")
3
>>> 
share|improve this answer
add comment

To fix your immediate problem, you just need to dedent the print and return

def func2():
    ch1 = input("Enter one character. ")
    str1 = str(input("Enter a string. "))
    list_1 = list(str1)
    a = 0
    for 1 in list_1:
        if func1(ch1, list_1):
            a += 1
        else:
            a += 0
    print(a)  # <-- dedent
    return a  # <-- dedent

You don't need to convert the string to a list to iterate over it. You don't need the else clause if it doesn't do anything. You shouldn't return from inside the for loop

def func2():
    ch1 = input("Enter one character. ")
    str1 = input("Enter a string. ")
    a = 0
    for c in str1:
        if c == ch:
            a += 1
        print(a)
    return a

More simply

def func2():
    ch1 = input("Enter one character. ")
    str1 = input("Enter a string. ")
    return str1.count(ch1)
share|improve this answer
    
That works, but I have to use the first function I have up there within the second function. I would do it the way you suggest, and I agree it's easier, but I was was told to do it a very specific way for a homework assignment. Thanks. –  Ivan Lesiv Mar 5 '13 at 20:05
    
@IvanLesiv, you can simplify func1. def func1(x1, x2): return x1 == x2 –  gnibbler Mar 5 '13 at 20:06
    
I did that. I simplified func1 and moved the return statement into the proper block, but I have to construct func2 in such a way that it includes func1. I tried to do that and the fuction only prints out a bunch of zeros, (one zero for every character in the string). –  Ivan Lesiv Mar 5 '13 at 20:10
    
Nope, forget it. Your more simplified example works just fine. But when I try the longer piece of code with the for loop, I get a series of zeros printed out. –  Ivan Lesiv Mar 5 '13 at 20:25
    
Never mind. There's no problem. I figured everything out. –  Ivan Lesiv Mar 5 '13 at 20:51
add comment

Few possible ways.

Using list

>>> len([x for x in test_string if x == test_char])

Using collections.Counter

>>> from collections import Counter
>>> print(Counter(test_string)[test_char])
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for using list comprehension, a very nice feature of python. –  Saher Mar 5 '13 at 20:24
    
@Saher, but not really appropriate here as it creates a temporary list when you really just need to keep count of one thing. –  gnibbler Mar 5 '13 at 21:53
add comment

The problem is that the return is indented one block to deep, so after comparing the first character of the list, the function returns.

(Another problem is that your function func1 is not only poorly named, but also far too complicated:

def cmp_chars(x, y):
    return x == y

Though you really don't need a function for that at all.)

share|improve this answer
    
That's part of the isse, but not the whole thing. I did what you suggested, but now, when I take, say, "a" as my character, and "aaaaa" as my string, instead of printing out 5, the fuctio prints out 0 five times. –  Ivan Lesiv Mar 5 '13 at 20:01
add comment

assuming the code you put there is correctly formatted unindent your return one block - it looks like it's getting called once throught the for block

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.