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I have implemented insertion sort in python and was wondering how to determine the complexity of the algorithm. Is this an inefficient way of implementing insertion sort? To me, this seems like the most readable algorithm.

import random as rand
source = [3,1,0,10,20,2,1]
target = []
while len(source)!=0:
 if len(target) ==0:
  target.append(source[0])
  source.pop(0)
 element = source.pop(0)
 if(element <= target[0]):
  target.reverse()
  target.append(element)
  target.reverse()
 elif element > target[len(target)-1]:
  target.append(element) 
 else:
  for i in range(0,len(target)-1):
   if element >= target[i] and element <= target[i+1]:
    target.insert(i+1,element)
    break
print target 
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1  
Not your question, but since you've mentioned "readability": in python, while len(source)!=0 is equivalent to while source if you know that source is a list or string, etc. Also, if len(target) == 0 can be if not target –  askewchan Mar 5 '13 at 21:10
2  
Reading PEP-8 is also recommended. Indent by 4 spaces, for example. –  Tim Pietzcker Mar 5 '13 at 21:18
    
Without commenting on your code, Python's built-in sort is always going to be faster than a sort written in python. 1,000,000 iterations of your code takes 9.98 seconds on my box; 1,000,000 iterations of target = sorted(source) takes 1.05 seconds. –  Neil Mar 5 '13 at 21:18
    
You may wish to look at the bisect module –  Jon Clements Mar 5 '13 at 21:28
    
you only intend for the first if statement inside your while loop to be called once. So move it out of the loop - place it before the loop. As it is now, given a one element list, your function will try to pop an element from it - twice. –  Will Ness Mar 5 '13 at 21:30
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Instead of:

target.reverse()
target.append(element)
target.reverse()

try:

target.insert(0, element)

Also, maybe use a for loop, instead of a while loop, to avoid source.pop()?:

for value in source:
  ...

In the final else block, the first part of the if test is redundant:

else:
   for i in range(0,len(target)-1):
     if element >= target[i] and element <= target[i+1]:
        target.insert(i+1,element)
        break

Since the list is already sorted, as soon as you find an element larger than the one you're inserting, you've found the insertion location.

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1  
inserting 10 into [1,4,17], without the second part of that test, 10 would be inserted after 1. So the 2nd part of that test is needed. –  Will Ness Mar 5 '13 at 21:32
    
Good point, @WillNess. It's the first part that is redundant. My note after the comment block was my main point. I updated the answer. –  Neil Mar 6 '13 at 1:39
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I would say it is rather inefficient. How can you tell? Your approach creates a second array, but you don't need one in a selection sort. You use a lot of operations -- selection sort requires lookups and exchanges, but you have lookups, appends, pops, inserts, and reverses. So you know that you can probably do better.

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def insertionsort( aList ):
  for i in range( 1, len( aList ) ):
    tmp = aList[i]
    k = i
    while k > 0 and tmp < aList[k - 1]:
        aList[k] = aList[k - 1]
        k -= 1
    aList[k] = tmp

This code is taken from geekviewpoint.com. Clearly it's a O(n^2) algorithm since it's using two loops. If the input is already sorted, however, then it's O(n) since the while-loop would then always be skipped due to tmp < aList[k - 1] failing.

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