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I found a nice utility script which efficiently outputs a desired number of lines from a desired start line. I have named it mid.bak and it is based on a post here >> http://www.fastechws.com/tricks/unix/head_tail_mid_files.php

Usage: mid.bak startline numlines filename

$ cat mid.bak
#!/bin/sh
echo "Positional parameter count: $#"
tail -n +$1 $3 | head -n $2
echo "Parameter three is: $3"

Case I: per the normal usage outlined above, positional parameter "$3" is found.

$ mid.bak 3 2 file.txt
Positional parameter count: 3
This line 3 in file.txt
This line 4 in file.txt
Parameter three is: file.txt

Cases II & III : "$3" is mysteriously absent.

$ mid.bak 3 2 < file.txt
Positional parameter count: 2
This line 3 in file.txt
This line 4 in file.txt
Parameter three is: 

$ cat file.txt | mid.bak 3 2
Positional parameter count: 2
This line 3 in file.txt
This line 4 in file.txt
Parameter three is: 

My question: Positional parameter $3 above is available to the script by the normal $1, $2 .. reference for Case I. So why it is not included in the count "$#" & not echoing out for cases II & III?

share|improve this question
    
Because there are only two arguments to your program in cases 2 and 3. Try adding another argument after 3 2 and see what it prints out – Hunter McMillen Mar 5 '13 at 21:15
    
Thank you Hunter. But notice that $3 is in fact available and used just the same in EVERY case: tail -n +$1 $3 .. ah, the script used $3. – Randy Skretka Mar 5 '13 at 21:26
up vote 3 down vote accepted

In case I, the name of the file is the 3rd parameter. In cases II and III, there is no 3rd parameter, so $3 expands to the empty string and, as it isn't quoted, is removed from the list of parameters passed to tail. tail, not receiving a file name in its argument list, reads instead from standard input, which is connected to file.txt via the < operator in case II and to the output of cat file.txt via a pipeline in case III.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you chepner. I am working up a more elaborate script along these lines and I understand this parameter delema now. :) – Randy Skretka Mar 5 '13 at 23:15

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