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I wrote a method that accepts a generic parameter and then it prints its properties. I use it to test my web service. It's working but I want to add some features that I don't know how to implement. I want to print values of lists, because now it just writes System.Collection.Generic.List1 which is expected.

Here is my code so far, this is working for basic types (int, double etc.):

static void printReturnedProperties<T>(T Object)
{ 
   PropertyInfo[] propertyInfos = null;
   propertyInfos = Object.GetType().GetProperties();

   foreach (var item in propertyInfos)
      Console.WriteLine(item.Name + ": " + item.GetValue(Object).ToString());
}
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Why is that method generic (with a <T> type parameter) and you're never using the T for anything? –  HighCore Mar 5 '13 at 21:16
5  
You should use a parameter name other than Object to save yourself from confusion with the built in object/Object. –  Umar Farooq Khawaja Mar 5 '13 at 21:17
2  
@p.s.w.g I don't see how that would be different from removing the type parameter completely and just doing PrintReturnedProperties(subclass). His method is NOT using the T paremeter at all!! –  HighCore Mar 5 '13 at 21:21
1  
@gGololicic - no, in your example you don't need generics. GetType is a method on any object. Changing your signature to static void printReturnedProperties(object Object) yields the same thing. This is why other comments suggest to change the name of the parameter from Object to something else as it is confusing. –  Jay Walker Mar 5 '13 at 22:07
1  
No, I'm definitely not saying always. just in this case, in your code sample it is not necessary. –  Jay Walker Mar 5 '13 at 22:13
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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could do something like this:

    static void printReturnedProperties(Object o)
    {
        PropertyInfo[] propertyInfos = null;
        propertyInfos = o.GetType().GetProperties();



        foreach (var item in propertyInfos)
        {
            var prop = item.GetValue(o);

            if(prop == null)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(item.Name + ": NULL");
            }
            else
            {
                Console.WriteLine(item.Name + ": " + prop.ToString());
            }


            if (prop is IEnumerable)
            {
                foreach (var listitem in prop as IEnumerable)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Item: " + listitem.ToString());
                }
            }
        }


    }

It will then enumerate through any IEnumerable and print out the individual values (I'm printing them one per line, but obviously, you can do different.)

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I tried this before I just got did something slightly wrong. Tnx –  gGololicic Mar 5 '13 at 21:46
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The elements inside a list can be retrieved through the indexer property Item. This property accepts an index argument (there is an overload of PropertyInfo.GetValue that accept an object array, just like MethodInfo.Invoke) and returns the object at that position.

int index = /* the index you want to get here */;
PropertyInfo indexer = Object.GetProperty("Item");
object item = indexer.GetValue(Object, new object[] { index });
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I usually prints list with a , between each item.

To make that easy I have created a simple extension method:

public static class ListEx
{
    public static string StringJoin<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items)
    {
        return string.Join(", ", items);
    }
}

Call the method as myList.StringJoin().

You can of course modify the method to use another delimiter och call string.Join directly.

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I'd personally just use string.Join(", ", myList). –  zneak Mar 5 '13 at 21:23
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Here is a snippet, assuming that your List is of Type T.

 foreach (PropertyInfo item in propertyInfos)
            {
                Object obj = item.GetValue(object,null);
                if (!obj.GetType().IsValueType)
                {
                    if (obj.GetType() == typeof(String))
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine(obj.ToString());
                    }
                    else if (obj.GetType() == typeof(List<T>))
                    {
                        //run a loop and print the list

                    }
                    else if (obj.GetType().IsArray) // this means its Array
                    {
                        //run a loop to print the array
                    }

                }
                else
                {
                    //its primitive so we will convert to string 
                    Console.WriteLine(obj.ToString());

                }
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I think you want something like this:

public class Program
{
    public static void PrintProperties<T>(T t)
    {
        var properties = t.GetType().GetProperties();

        foreach (var property in properties)
        {
            var name = property.Name;
            var value = property.GetValue(t, null);

            if (property.PropertyType.IsGenericType && property.PropertyType == typeof(IEnumerable<>))
            {
                var formatList = typeof(Program).GetMethod("FormatList", new[] { value.GetType() });

                // value.GetType().GetGenericArguments().First() will get you the underlying type of the list,
                // i.e., the TItemType where the property you are currently
                // handling is of type IEnumerable<TItemType>
                formatList.MakeGenericMethod(value.GetType().GetGenericArguments().First());

                value = formatList.Invoke(null, new object[] { value });

                Console.Out.WriteLine(name + ": " + value);
            }
            else
            {
                Console.Out.WriteLine(name + ": " + value);
            }
        }
    }

    public static string FormatList<TPlaceholder>(IEnumerable<TPlaceholder> l)
    {
        return string.Join(", ", l);
    }
}

The code is untested but basically, you want to tackle enumerable types differently as compared to scalar values, so once you hit something of the type IEnumerable<TItemType>, you make a call to the FormatList<TPlaceholder> method.

Now, bear in mind that your original T and TItemType are not necessarily the same. When you invoke FormatList using reflection, you want to bind the TPlaceholder to TItemType. Once you have done that, you just invoke the formatting method and pass it the actual instance of the list, which returns you a string. That string you can then just output.

Hope that helps.

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My solution is similar to the accepted answer, accept that in the accepted answer, we would be relying on the ToString() method giving something sensible, whereas in my version, we have a little more control over that because we can expand FormatList() to do something more sophisticated. –  Umar Farooq Khawaja Mar 5 '13 at 21:52
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