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I wanted to grep a string at the first occurrence ONLY from a file (file.dat) and replace it by reading from another file (output). I have a file called "output" as an example contains "AAA T 0001"

#!/bin/bash
procdir=`pwd`

cat output | while read lin1 lin2 lin3
do
  srt2=$(echo $lin1 $lin2 $lin3 | awk '{print $1,$2,$3}')
  grep -m 1 $lin1  $procdir/file.dat | xargs -r0 perl -pi -e 's/$lin1/$srt2/g'
done

Basically what I wanted is: When ever a string "AAA" is grep'ed from the file "file.dat" at the first instance, I want to replace the second and third column next to "AAA" by "T 0001" but still keep the first column "AAA" as it is. Th above script basically does not work. Basically "$lin1" and $srt2 variables are not understood inside 's/$lin1/$srt2/g'

Example:

in my file.dat I have a row

AAA D ---- CITY COUNTRY

What I want is :

AAA T 0001 CITY COUNTRY

Any comments are very appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
if you need to replace only the first ocurrence, you should drop the "g" at the perl regexpr of substitution: perl -pi -e 's/$lin1/$srt2/' –  Miguel Prz Mar 5 '13 at 21:24
    
sorry, didn't understand what you want to do... :( –  Kent Mar 5 '13 at 21:24
    
Editing your question to include sample input and required output would make this much easier to provide a solution . Good luck. –  shellter Mar 5 '13 at 23:19
    
You say "Does this work ?" I ask "Well, does it?" What happens when you try it? –  Andy Lester Mar 6 '13 at 1:37
    
I have re-edited my questions. Andy, it does not. Shelter, I have added example. Miguel, only removing "g" does not help. –  Yacob Mar 6 '13 at 8:07

3 Answers 3

If you have output file like this:

$ cat output
AAA T 0001

Your file.dat file contains information like:

$ cat file.dat
AAA D ---- CITY COUNTRY
BBB C ---- CITY COUNTRY
AAA D ---- CITY COUNTRY

You can try something like this with awk:

$ awk '
NR==FNR { 
    a[$1]=$0
    next
} 
$1 in a {
    printf "%s ", a[$1]
    delete a[$1]
        for (i=4;i<=NF;i++) { 
            printf "%s ", $i 
        }
    print ""
    next
}1' output file.dat
AAA T 0001 CITY COUNTRY
BBB C ---- CITY COUNTRY
AAA D ---- CITY COUNTRY
share|improve this answer

Say you place the string for which to search in $s and the string with which to replace in $r, wouldn't the following do?

perl -i -pe'
   BEGIN { ($s,$r)=splice(@ARGV,0,2) }
   $done ||= s/\Q$s/$r/;
' "$s" "$r" file.dat

(Replaces the first instance if present)

share|improve this answer

This will only change the first match in the file:

#!/bin/bash
procdir=`pwd`
while read line; do
    set $line
    sed '0,/'"$1"'/s/\([^ ]* \)\([^ ]* [^ ]*\)/\1'"$2 $3"'/' $procdir/file.dat
done < output

To change all matching lines:

sed '/'"$1"'/s/\([^ ]* \)\([^ ]* [^ ]*\)/\1'"$2 $3"'/' $procdir/file.dat
share|improve this answer

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