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I recently uncovered a memory leak in an application I maintain for work, and I'm confused as to why the code produces a leak. I've pulled out the relevant code (with slight modifications) and provided it below.

In our application, a given XML document could validate against one or more available schema files. Each schema file corresponds to a different version of the XML document as it has changed over time. We only care that the XML document validates against at least one schema. Each schema completely describes the contents of the XML document (they are not nested schema files).

According to the ANTS memory profiler, it looks like the XmlDocument object is hording references to the previous schemas, even after the schema set has been cleared. Commenting out the call to Validate(), leaving everything else the same, will stop the leak.

I fixed the leak in our application by loading the schemas once at application initialization time, and swapping out which schema file is associated with the XML document until we find one that validates.

The code below produces the memory leak, and I'm not sure why.

class Program
{
    private static XmlDocument xmlDocument_ = new XmlDocument();

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader("contents.xml"))
        {
            xmlDocument_.LoadXml(reader.ReadToEnd());
        }

        XmlReaderSettings xmlReaderSettings = new XmlReaderSettings();
        xmlReaderSettings.CloseInput = true;

        while (true)
        {
            xmlDocument_.Schemas = new XmlSchemaSet();

            XmlReader xmlReader = XmlReader.Create("schema.xsd", xmlReaderSettings);

            xmlDocument_.Schemas.Add(XmlSchema.Read(xmlReader, null));

            xmlReader.Close();

            xmlDocument_.Validate(null);
        }
    }
}
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1  
its that following _ that's doing it. The GC can't fathom why its there, and loses track of references. –  Will Mar 5 '13 at 21:47
    
Thanks, Will... –  sonofanickel Mar 5 '13 at 21:53
    
Nothing obvious in the source. You sure you're reading the profiler correctly? Have you tested this with a release build? –  Will Mar 5 '13 at 21:55
1  
Is it possible that the XmlTextReader isn't being disposed? –  Jim Mischel Mar 5 '13 at 23:13
2  
+1 @JimMischel. Microsoft has been recommending XmlReader over XmlTextReader since .NET 2.0. The leak could be caused by not explicitly disposing the XmlTextReader (see Common Scenarios That Result In Memory Leaks And How To Avoid Them). Try using XmlReaderSettings.CloseInput as in my answer here. –  groverboy Mar 6 '13 at 1:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You have the memory leak because your XmlDocument reference is static and because of the SchemaInfo property, which is populated when you validate your XML. Since those properties hold references to objects from your compiled XSDs, you'll have those around for as long as you have the XmlDocument around, which could be quite a while (since it is static).

Some people may argue if indeed this is a leak or not: validating another XML with another set of XSDs will release previously held resources.

share|improve this answer
    
can you expand on your answer? I have assumed your response to mean that if I load the contents of another XML document into the static XML document, and replace the schema set with another that contains a schema that validates against the new XML contents, that the "leak" will go away. I tried this, and I'm still seeing the "leak". –  sonofanickel Mar 12 '13 at 20:52
    
Yes, your assumption is correct. I am using Scitech's memory profiler and I can't say that I've noticed a "leak" using the code you've provided (beside the normal behavior). Sorry, I am not familiar with ANTS so I can't comment any further on that one. Let me ask you this: say your XSD set has 4 XSDs; you mean to say that the number of "live" XmlSchema objects in your memory dump is x times 4, where x is the number of iterations in your loop? –  Petru Gardea Mar 12 '13 at 21:09
    
The MSDN documentation of the SchemaInfo property is a bit unclear to me. Nothing mentioned for property or its type IXmlSchemaInfo leads me to believe it is storing information to about multiple schema validation attempts - there's no obvious way to access information about more than the latest validation. Am I missing something? I would expect that a new concrete implementation of IXmlSchemaInfo is created each time the document is validated against a new schema, and all references to the old one lost. I'll get back to you with an answer about the profiler question. –  sonofanickel Dec 6 '13 at 17:38

Try changing the while statement as below. I haven't tested this but it differs from the original code in that every while iteration disposes of the XmlReader.

The GC may dispose automatically of the XmlReader instances eventually but I doubt it, because XmlReader implements IDispose. That is, code that uses XmlReader must dispose it deterministically (garbage-collection is non-deterministic). If the GC was capable of disposing them, and if the while iterates thousands of times before the GC does this, the memory used will be killing the system anyway.

while (true)
{
    xmlDocument_.Schemas = new XmlSchemaSet();

    using (XmlReader xmlReader = XmlReader.Create("schema.xsd", xmlReaderSettings))
    {
        xmlDocument_.Schemas.Add(XmlSchema.Read(xmlReader, null));
    }

    xmlDocument_.Validate(null);
}

EDIT:

I read the MSDN page on XmlDocument.Validate, which provides a code sample that does this differently, using XmlReaderSettings to set validation options. Also, code in the OP assumes that the XML file is always encoded as UTF-8. Here's a rewrite that detects the text encoding and is based on the MSDN sample; this may fix the memory leak. This code is untested.

class Program
{
    private static XmlDocument xmlDocument_ = new XmlDocument();

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        XmlReaderSettings settings = new XmlReaderSettings();
        settings.ValidationType = ValidationType.Schema;
        settings.CloseInput = true;

        xmlDocument_.Load(XmlReader.Create("contents.xml", settings));

        while (true)
        {
            settings.Schemas = new XmlSchemaSet();
            settings.Schemas.Add(null, "schema.xsd");

            xmlDocument_.Validate(null);
        }
    }
}

You could try ILDASM to see what's inside XmlDocument.Validate.

share|improve this answer
    
I made this edit and I'm still seeing the leak. It makes it hard to feel certain about the leak because of the non-deterministic nature of the GC... I did add a call to GC.Collect() and GC.GetTotalMemory(true) after the call to Validate() and the memory does indeed climb. –  sonofanickel Mar 7 '13 at 15:12
    
Setting the validation type also does not appear to make any difference. –  sonofanickel Mar 12 '13 at 20:12

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