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I'm defining some new methods on String. I need to be sure these methods do not conflict with methods defined in other libraries (for reference, I created an inflector and then added pluralize and singularize onto String).

My first thought was to wrap the new stuff in a module like so:

module MM
  class String
    def rev
      self.split('').reverse.join('')
    end
  end
end

class Test
  include MM

  def me(s)
    s.rev
  end
end

puts Test.new.me('this is a test')

but of course this doesn't work. String#rev remains undefined. What I really have in my code is a module MM and everything except the built-in type extensions is wrapped in MM. My goal is to have String have methods like rev, singularize and pluralize but only inside that module, MM.

This seems like it ought to be doable. But somehow I'm missing the secret incantation that will make it so.

If anyone can offer some suggestions it would be much appreciated.

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Not totally sure I understand; you want to extend String only within your own class? –  Dave Newton Mar 5 '13 at 22:18
    
Only within my own module. I just need to avoid these stepping on other implementations and vice versa. I know I can rename them to solve the problem but this seems like what namespaces were designed for. –  Steve Ross Mar 5 '13 at 22:26
    
It's what "concerns" were designed for; dynamically defining/undefining methods inside a class is something a bit different. If you want to define the methods in a module and put them into String that's different than only having those methods available within a specific scope. –  Dave Newton Mar 5 '13 at 22:29
    
I think Ruby 2.0 introduced some new monkey-patching features that (might) help with these sorts of things. –  Linuxios Mar 5 '13 at 23:21
    
Below ruby 2.0, you can only put the monkey patch in global space, which will affects all classes (does not meet your requirement); in ruby 2.0, you can use refinement showing in the answer below, which is your only choice –  texasbruce Mar 5 '13 at 23:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're looking for "refinements". They are an experimental feature in Ruby 2.0, so you might be out of luck if you're not using 2.0. I haven't used them myself yet, but your example is almost the canonical use case for refinements. Use the refine and using keywords to get the behavior you want:

module MM
  refine class String
    def rev
      self.split('').reverse.join('')
    end
  end
end

class Test
  using MM

  def me(s)
    s.rev
  end
end

puts Test.new.me('this is a test')
share|improve this answer
1  
BTW: This doesn't work. I only just discovered this myself a couple of minutes ago while writing pretty much exactly what you wrote above ;-) It did work until very recently, but the specification for Refinements was changed shortly before the release of 2.0.0-p0. In particular, using is defined as a private singleton method of the top-level main object, which means it is only available in top-level scope. Thus, Refinements always apply to the entire file and all modules and classes defined within (but only after the call to using, of course). –  Jörg W Mittag Mar 6 '13 at 0:03
    
Calling using within a class or module declaration and having the Refinement only apply within that scope did work until recently, and probably will work in the future, but for the release version of Ruby 2.0, it is disabled. Unfortunately, all the blog posts, and indeed my own answers on StackOverflow show exactly that usage. –  Jörg W Mittag Mar 6 '13 at 0:05
    
Oh, snap. I'm stuck on 1.9 for now. I think I'll use the brute force method of naming my methods mm_singularize or mm_pluralize for right now. It's a language issue (IMO) -- particularly when multiple libraries (gems) are likely to need/implement similar methods but are unwilling to introduce a dependency on, say, ActiveSupport. –  Steve Ross Mar 6 '13 at 0:13
    
Oh, thanks for the additional info, Jörg. I agree it's a language issue, Steve. Hopefully refinements become a stable feature in the future. I believe it would be the first time a major language addresses this issue out of the box. Smalltalk (which kinda has open classes like Ruby) has the same problem. There was work in the Smalltalk world on a concept similar to refinements, called "classboxes", but I don't think it went anywhere. –  nhaldimann Mar 6 '13 at 0:29
1  
This is getting way off-topic, but many years ago I worked with Alex Bergel when he was working on classboxes. They were certainly first prototyped in Smalltalk (way easier to do than in Java). Proposing/implementing a Java version later may have been a strategic decision because it was easier to get a Java paper into OOPSLA at the time ... –  nhaldimann Mar 6 '13 at 4:16

Lacking refinements, you could extend individual string objects:

module StringHelper
  def rev
    self.split('').reverse.join('')
  end
end

class Test
  def me(s)
    s.extend(StringHelper).rev
  end
end

Or subclass String:

class StringPlus < String
  def rev
    self.split('').reverse.join('')
  end
  def self.[](s)
    new(s)
  end
end

class Test
  def me(s)
    StringPlus[s].rev
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this suggestion. It was one of the directions I was looking at. The problem I'm facing is that these objects can be thrown at me by a user and the type is unknown until sussed out by a case statement -- my code is in a Gem. Explicitly creating a StringPlus for everything that might be a string seems like a code smell. I think simply renaming my particular extensions would leave me feeling less "dirty," if you know what I mean. –  Steve Ross Mar 6 '13 at 18:21

Well there is another way you can keep your string class separated. Until you add require it will be free from everything.

#my_string.rb
class String
  def rev
      self.split('').reverse.join('')
   end
end

#test.rb
class Test
  require 'F:\on going\New Site\Ruby\my_string.rb' # Assuming both these files are in the same folder


  def me(s)
    s.rev
  end
end


puts Test.new.me('this is a test')
share|improve this answer
    
gives NoMethodError: undefined method 'rev' for "this is a test":String –  AnkitG Mar 5 '13 at 22:47
    
That's because rev is not being added to String's methods. Your method 'm' works because it is simply an instance method on class Test. I'm wanting s.rev to work. –  Steve Ross Mar 5 '13 at 22:48
    
Thankyou for pointing out :D –  sadaf2605 Mar 6 '13 at 7:24

As a workaround in the absence of refinements, I found that this kind of thing works:

# class String
#   def rev
#     puts "rev: #{self}"
#   end
# end

class String
  unless String.instance_methods.include?(:rev)
    def rev
      self.split('').reverse.join('')
    end
  end
end

class Test
  def me(s)
    s.rev
  end
end

puts Test.new.me('this is a test')

If you uncomment the earlier definition of rev it will be honored and not overridden. This is a bit hacky and relies on the order in which files load, but it does work if the load order is controlled.

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