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Background: I have some results from clustering of biological data which shows the number of shared connections between clusters. What I am trying to accomplish is to reduce this list of pairwise relationships to unique sets of identifiers based on shared connections. The data format is straightforward, it has three columns that show 1) cluster ID i, 2) cluster ID j, and 3) the number of shared connections between i and j. A sample of the actual data is in the code below.

Here is the code I have so far:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use v5.10;
use strict;
use warnings;

my %linkage;

while (my $line = <DATA>) {
    my ($i, $j, $score) = split /\s+/, $line;
    if (exists $linkage{$i} && not exists $linkage{$j}) {
        push @{$linkage{$i}}, $j;
    }
    elsif (exists $linkage{$j}) {
        push @{$linkage{$j}}, $i;
    }
    else {
        $linkage{$i} = [$j];
    }
}

for my $key (sort keys %linkage) {
    say join "\t", $key, join ",", @{$linkage{$key}};
}

__DATA__
CL21    CL9     2628
CL36    CL33    2576
CL29    CL59    2384
CL65    CL36    2318
CL65    CL47    2151
CL32    CL17    2147
CL21    CL31    2136
CL23    CL17    2092
CL94    CL59    2091
CL16    CL11    2088

This produces:

CL16    CL11
CL21    CL9,CL31
CL23    CL17
CL29    CL59
CL32    CL17
CL36    CL33,CL65
CL65    CL47
CL94    CL59

There are two issues here that I would like some assistance/advice in solving. The first issue is that there are still duplicate entries in the second column (i.e., CL17), which I would like to reduce. The second issue is that an identifier should be added to an existing grouping if it has been seen before, instead of starting a new group (i.e., CL65). Note that I am not keeping the values in the output with this example, but you can see the input is sorted in descending order, so it makes sense (to me) to build up the groupings in this fashion based on what has been seen.

Desired output:

CL16,CL11
CL21,CL9,CL31
CL23,CL17,CL32
CL29,CL59,CL94
CL36,CL33,CL65,CL47

I hope it is clear from this desired output that each line should be a unique set (and the tab was added in the code/output above to make it easier to see the problems). If a question like this has been asked before, or illustrated on some other page, please let me know (and I apologize in that case).

share|improve this question
1  
Why these two are not merged? CL29,CL59 and CL94,CL59 – choroba Mar 5 '13 at 22:43
    
You are correct. Thanks for the keen observation, I'll update my question. – SES Mar 5 '13 at 22:54
    
Thanks to choroba and @Greg Bacon for the insight. Unfortunately, I'm unable to upvote or accept multiple answers. For my problem, Graph::UnionFind appears to be working quite well, so I accepted that answer. – SES Mar 7 '13 at 15:43
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The Graph::UnionFind module was written for this problem, computation of set partition.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use v5.10;
use strict;
use warnings;

use Graph::UnionFind;

my $uf = Graph::UnionFind->new;
my %vertex;
while (my $line = <DATA>) {
    my ($i, $j, $score) = split /\s+/, $line;

    ++$vertex{$_} for $i, $j;
    $uf->union($i, $j);
}

my %cluster;
foreach my $v (keys %vertex) {
    my $b = $uf->find($v);
    die "$0: no block for $v" unless defined $b;
    push @{ $cluster{$b} }, $v;
}

say join ",", @$_ for values %cluster;

__DATA__
CL21    CL9     2628
CL36    CL33    2576
CL29    CL59    2384
CL65    CL36    2318
CL65    CL47    2151
CL32    CL17    2147
CL21    CL31    2136
CL23    CL17    2092
CL94    CL59    2091
CL16    CL11    2088

Output:

CL9,CL21,CL31
CL33,CL65,CL47,CL36
CL59,CL94,CL29
CL11,CL16
CL17,CL23,CL32
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the links, that really helps for describing the problem. I like the simplicity of this (and it works as intended), but is the die .... unless defined $b necessary? That seems like a bad place to exit the program, but I guess it should always be defined and is just a test? – SES Mar 6 '13 at 14:47
    
@SES Yes, die there is inelegant. It is a condition that should never happen, so think of it as a sanity check or debug assertion. – Greg Bacon Mar 6 '13 at 17:05

The following codes creates the hash in the opposite sense: each identifier is a key, the value is the identifier of the group (by chance equal to one of its members). At the end, the hash is reversed to the structure you tried to build and printed. I am not sure whether the "merging" might occur in your data (imagine CL9 CL11 3000 as the last line), if not, you can safely remove it.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;
use feature qw(say);

my %linkage;

while (my $line = <DATA>) {
    my ($i, $j, $score) = split ' ', $line;
    if (exists $linkage{$i}) {
        if (exists $linkage{$j}) {
            warn "Merging $i and $j\n";
            $linkage{$_} = $linkage{$i} for grep $linkage{$_} eq $linkage{$j}, keys %linkage;
        }
        else {
            warn "Adding $j to $i\n";
            $linkage{$j} = $linkage{$i};
        }
    }
    elsif (exists $linkage{$j}) {
        warn "Adding $i to $j\n";
        $linkage{$i} = $linkage{$j};
    }
    else {
        warn "New $i and $j to $i\n";
        @linkage{$i, $j} = ($i) x 2;
    }
}

my %groups;
for my $key (keys %linkage) {
    push @{ $groups{ $linkage{$key} } }, $key;
}

for my $key (sort keys %groups) {
    say join ',' => @{ $groups{$key} };
}
share|improve this answer
    
Could you please elaborate on how you think "merging" might occur. This solution does exactly what I intended, but I'd like to know if there are cases in which it may produce unintended groupings. – SES Mar 6 '13 at 14:38
    
@SES: Merging occurs if there are is a pair of ids which belong to two different groups, i.e. both of them were already mentioned, but do not yet belong to the same group. – choroba Mar 6 '13 at 16:54

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