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I'm using a CGMutablePathRef to create an arbitrary poly so I can clip further drawing in my context using CGContextClip.

This has the very annoying and unwanted behavior of being non-inclusive of the "border" pixels of the path. So, for example in my code snippet here, I am clipping a rectangle in half, then coloring each half - the resulting image leaves a thin line where the borders of the paths are not colored:

enter image description here


- (void)drawRect:(CGRect)rect
{
    CGContextRef ctxt = UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext();
    CGContextSetFillColorWithColor(ctxt, [UIColor whiteColor].CGColor);
    CGContextFillRect(ctxt, rect);
    CGContextSaveGState(ctxt);

    //Create a path to clip a triangle:
    CGMutablePathRef path = CGPathCreateMutable();
    CGPathMoveToPoint(path, NULL, 0, 0);
    CGPathAddLineToPoint(path, NULL, rect.size.width, 0);
    CGPathAddLineToPoint(path, NULL, 0, rect.size.height);
    CGContextAddPath(ctxt, path);
    CGContextClip(ctxt);

    //Fill the triangle with dark gray:
    CGContextSetFillColorWithColor(ctxt, [UIColor darkGrayColor].CGColor);
    CGContextFillRect(ctxt, rect);
    CGPathRelease(path);


    CGContextRestoreGState(ctxt);


    //Create a path to clip a triangle:
    path = CGPathCreateMutable();
    CGPathMoveToPoint(path, NULL, 0, rect.size.height);
    CGPathAddLineToPoint(path, NULL, rect.size.width, 0);
    CGPathAddLineToPoint(path, NULL, rect.size.width, rect.size.height);
    CGContextAddPath(ctxt, path);
    CGContextClip(ctxt);

    //Fill the triangle with dark Gray:
    CGContextSetFillColorWithColor(ctxt, [UIColor darkGrayColor].CGColor);
    CGContextFillRect(ctxt, rect);
    CGPathRelease(path);

}

How can I clip a context in a way that will be inclusive of the "border" pixels?

share|improve this question

The reason is likely because coordinates in Quartz correspond to the "spaces" in between pixels, rather than the pixels themselves. If you draw a line from (0, 100) to (100, 100) with a stroke width of 1, you'll see that it fills in the pixels at Y offset 99 and Y offset 100 with 50% of the colour you selected, using its anti-aliasing algorithm. On the other hand, if you draw a line from (0, 100.5) to (100, 100.5), only the pixels at Y offset 100 will be filled, and they will be filled with exactly the colour you selected.

Edit: To go into more detail on this particular seam, the problem is how anti-aliasing is accomplished. Anti-aliasing on an LCD display usually takes advantage of sub-pixel rendering, where a pixel can be broken down horizontally into three adjacent sub-pixels, the red, green, and blue components. If a partially covered pixel is to the right of the fill region, its red component might be given preference because it's physically closer to the region, and likewise for a green component to the left of the fill region. Both polygons are partially covering the same pixels, but they're deciding how to fill them independently, so there's no guarantee that the resulting colour will add up exactly to the weighted mean of the two polygon colours.

share|improve this answer
    
so are you saying that the location of pixel 0,0 should be referenced as (-0.5, -0.5)? – typewriter Mar 6 '13 at 6:44
    
It should be referenced as (0.5, 0.5), because the pixel "at" (0, 0) is the rect from (0, 0) to (1, 1). – Tony Mar 6 '13 at 15:27
    
I understand what you're saying. And, wouldn't it follow that in order to get all your drawing "on" the pixels, one could simply add (0.5, 0.5) to every coordinate? That does in fact make the given example look correct. However, in practice I'm not drawing rectangles but complex polygons. And in that case, this simple shifting doesn't correct the issue, so there must be more to it. – typewriter Mar 6 '13 at 16:47
    
I've added an edit that should clarify why it should work in theory but not in practice. – Tony Mar 6 '13 at 19:31
    
I believe after reading this and other posts, as well as my own scientific experimentation, that there is no guaranteed way to edge-blend arbitrary paths when used for clipping. I feel that this is bad behavior, as two polys sharing a mathematical boundary, when used for clipping, should produce a seamless edge. – typewriter Mar 6 '13 at 20:00

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