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The keyword static is one which has several meanings in C++ that I find very confusing and I can never bend my mind around how its actually supposed to work.

From what I understand there is static storage duration, which means that it lasts for the lifetime of the program in the case of a global, but when you're talking about a local, it means that it's zero initialized by default.

The C++ Standard says this for class data members with the keyword static:

3.7.1 Static storage duration [basic.stc.static]

3 The keyword static can be used to declare a local variable with static storage duration.

4 The keyword static applied to a class data member in a class definition gives the data member static storage duration.

What does it mean with local variable? Is that a function local variable? Because there's also that when you declare a function local as static that it is only initialized once, the first time it enters this function.

It also only talks about storage duration with regards to class members, what about it being non instance specific, that's also a property of static no? Or is that storage duration?

Now what about the case with static and file scope? Are all global variables considered to have static storage duration by default? The following (from section 3.7.1) seems to indicate so:

1 All variables which do not have dynamic storage duration, do not have thread storage duration, and are not local have static storage duration. The storage for these entities shall last for the duration of the program (3.6.2, 3.6.3)

How does static relate to the linkage of a variable?

This whole static keyword is downright confusing, can someone clarify the different uses for it English and also tell me when to initialize a static class member?

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7 Answers

up vote 21 down vote accepted

static variables exist for the "lifetime" of the translation unit that it's defined in, and:

  • If it's in a namespace scope, then it can't be accessed from any other translation unit. This is known as "internal linkage". (Dont' do this in headers, it's just a terrible idea)
  • If it's a variable in a function, it can't be accessed from outside of the function. (this is the local they mentioned)
  • class members have no restricted scope due to static, but can be addressed from the class as well as an instance (like std::string::npos).

Before any function in a translation unit is executed (possibly after main began execution), the variables with static storage duration in that translation unit will be "constant initialized" (to constexpr where possible, or zero otherwise), and then non-locals are "dynamically initialized" properly in the order they are defined in the translation unit (for things like std::string="HI"; that aren't constexpr). Finally, function-local statics are initialized the first time execution "reaches" the line where they are declared. They are all destroyed in the reverse order of initialization.

The easiest way to get all this right is to make all static variables that are not constexpr initialized into function static locals, which makes sure all of your statics/globals are initialized properly when you try to use them no matter what, thus preventing the static initialization order fiasco.

T& get_global() {
    static T global = initial_value();
    return global;
}

Be careful, because when the spec says namespace-scope variables have "static storage duration" by default, they mean the "lifetime of the translation unit" bit, but that does not mean it can't be accessed outside of the file.

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What about class members? Isn't it a third separate case? –  Étienne Mar 5 '13 at 22:50
1  
@Etienne - static class data members are the same as static global variables except that you can access them from other translation units, and any access (except from member functions) must specify the classname:: scope. Static class member functions are like global functions but scoped to the class, or like normal members but without this (that's not a choice - those two should be equivalent). –  Steve314 Mar 5 '13 at 22:53
    
@EtienneCordonnier: I only wrote about the special mechanics for the two cases that have special mechanics. I tried to clarify how member functions work a little. –  Mooing Duck Mar 5 '13 at 22:53
    
I wouldn't call static namespace variables global. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 5 '13 at 22:56
1  
@LuchianGrigore: while I see your point, I'm not sure what wording to use. –  Mooing Duck Mar 5 '13 at 22:57
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Static storage duration means that the variable resides in the same place in memory through the lifetime of the program.

Linkage is orthogonal to this.

I think this is the most important distinction you can make. Understand this and the rest, as well as remembering it, should come easy (not addressing @Tony directly, but whoever might read this in the future).

The keyword static can be used to denote internal linkage and static storage, but in essence these are different.

What does it mean with local variable? Is that a function local variable?

Yes. Regardless of when the variable is initialized (on first call to the function and when execution path reaches the declaration point), it will reside in the same place in memory for the life of the program. In this case, static gives it static storage.

Now what about the case with static and file scope? Are all global variables considered to have static storage duration by default?

Yes, all globals have by definition static storage duration (now that we cleared up what that means). But namespace scoped variables aren't declared with static, because that would give them internal linkage, so a variable per translation unit.

How does static relate to the linkage of a variable?

It gives namespace-scoped variables internal linkage. It gives members and local variables static storage duration.

Let's expand on all this:

//

static int x; //internal linkage
              //non-static storage - each translation unit will have its own copy of x
              //NOT A TRUE GLOBAL!

int y;        //static storage duration (can be used with extern)
              //actual global
              //external linkage
struct X
{
   static int x;     //static storage duration - shared between classes
};

void foo()
{
   static int x;     //static storage duration - shared between calls
}

This whole static keyword is downright confusing

Definitely, unless you're familiar with it. :) Trying to avoid adding new keywords to the language, the committee re-used this one, IMO, to this effect - confusion. It's used to signify different things (might I say, probably opposing things).

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It's actually quite simple. If you declare a variable as static in the scope of a function, its value is preserved between successive calls to that function. So:

int myFun()
{
static int i=5;
i++;
return i;
}
int main()
{
printf("%d", myFun());
printf("%d", myFun());
printf("%d", myFun());
}

will show 678 instead of 666, because it remembers the incremented value.

As for the static members, they preserve their value across instances of the class. So the following code:

struct A
{
static int a;
};
int main()
{
A first;
A second;
first.a = 3;
second.a = 4;
printf("%d", first.a);
}

will print 4, because first.a and second.a are essentially the same variable. As for the initialization, see this question.

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Static variables are shared between every instance of a class, instead of each class having their own variable.

class MyClass
{
    public:
    int myVar; 
    static int myStaticVar;
};

//Static member variables must be initialized. Unless you're using C++11, or it's an integer type,
//they have to be defined and initialized outside of the class like this:
MyClass::myStaticVar = 0;

MyClass classA;
MyClass classB;

Each instance of 'MyClass' has their own 'myVar', but share the same 'myStaticVar'. In fact, you don't even need an instance of MyClass to access 'myStaticVar', and you can access it outside of the class like this:

MyClass::myStaticVar //Assuming it's publicly accessible.

When used inside a function as a local variable (and not as a class member-variable) the static keyword does something different. It allows you to create a persistent variable, without giving global scope.

int myFunc()
{
   int myVar = 0; //Each time the code reaches here, a new variable called 'myVar' is initialized.
   myVar++;

   //Given the above code, this will *always* print '1'.
   std::cout << myVar << std::endl;

   //The first time the code reaches here, 'myStaticVar' is initialized. But ONLY the first time.
   static int myStaticVar = 0;

   //Each time the code reaches here, myStaticVar is incremented.
   myStaticVar++;

   //This will print a continuously incrementing number,
   //each time the function is called. '1', '2', '3', etc...
   std::cout << myStaticVar << std::endl;
}

It's a global variable in terms of persistence... but without being global in scope/accessibility.

You can also have static functions (in classes, not standalone). Static functions are basically standalone functions, but inside the class name's namespace, and with private access to the class's members.

class MyClass
{
    public:
    int Func()
    {
        //...do something...
    }

    static int StaticFunc()
    {
        //...do something...
    }
};

int main()
{
   MyClass myClassA;
   myClassA.Func(); //Calls 'Func'.
   myClassA.StaticFunc(); //Calls 'StaticFunc'.

   MyClass::StaticFunc(); //Calls 'StaticFunc'.
   MyClass::Func(); //Error: You can't call a non-static member-function without a class instance!

   return 0;
}

When you call a member-function, there's a hidden parameter called 'this', that is a pointer to the instance of the class calling the function. Static member functions don't have that hidden parameter... they are callable without a class instance, but also cannot access non-static member variables of a class, because they don't have a 'this' pointer to work with. They aren't being called on any specific class instance.

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1  
"Assuming it's publicly accessible." - it's not. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 5 '13 at 22:43
2  
myStaticVar needs to be defined also. Kinda important to mention that when answering a question about the semantics of the static keyword, don't you think? –  Praetorian Mar 5 '13 at 22:46
    
@Praetorian: Thanks, fixed. –  Jamin Grey Mar 5 '13 at 22:57
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What does it mean with local variable? Is that a function local variable?

Yes - Non-global, such as a function local variable.

Because there's also that when you declare a function local as static that it is only initialized once, the first time it enters this function.

Right.

It also only talks about storage duration with regards to class members, what about it being non instance specific, that's also a property of static no? Or is that storage duration?

class R { static int a; }; // << static lives for the duration of the program

that is to say, all instances of R share int R::a -- int R::a is never copied.

Now what about the case with static and file scope?

Effectively a global which has constructor/destructor where appropriate -- initialization is not deferred until access.

How does static relate to the linkage of a variable?

For a function local, it is external. Access: It's accessible to the function (unless of course, you return it).

For a class, it is external. Access: Standard access specifiers apply (public, protected, private).

static can also specify internal linkage, depending on where it's declared (file/namespace).

This whole static keyword is downright confusing

It has too many purposes in C++.

can someone clarify the different uses for it English and also tell me when to initialize a static class member?

It's automatically initialized before main if it's loaded and has a constructor. That might sound like a good thing, but initialization order is largely beyond your control, so complex initialization becomes very difficult to maintain, and you want to minimize this -- if you must have a static, then function local scales much better across libraries and projects. As far as data with static storage duration, you should try to minimize this design, particularly if mutable (global variables). Initialization 'time' also varies for a number of reasons -- the loader and kernel have some tricks to minimize memory footprints and defer initialization, depending on the data in question.

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I'm not a C programmer so I can't give you information on the uses of static in a C program properly, but when it comes to Object Oriented programming static basically declares a variable, or a function or a class to be the same throughout the life of the program. Take for example.

class A
{
public:
    A();
    ~A();
    void somePublicMethod();
private:
    void somePrivateMethod();
};

When you instantiate this class in your Main you do something like this.

int main()
{
   A a1;
   //do something on a1
   A a2;
   //do something on a2
}

These two class instances are completely different from each other and operate independently from one another. But if you were to recreate the class A like this.

class A
{
public:
    A();
    ~A();
    void somePublicMethod();
    static int x;
private:
    void somePrivateMethod();
};

Lets go back to the main again.

int main()
{
   A a1;
   a1.x = 1;
   //do something on a1
   A a2;
   a2.x++;
   //do something on a2
}

Then a1 and a2 would share the same copy of int x whereby any operations on x in a1 would directly influence the operations of x in a2. So if I was to do this

int main()
{
   A a1;
   a1.x = 1;
   //do something on a1
   cout << a1.x << endl; //this would be 1
   A a2;
   a2.x++;
   cout << a2.x << endl; //this would be 2 
   //do something on a2
}

Both instances of the class A share static variables and functions. Hope this answers your question. My limited knowledge of C allows me to say that defining a function or variable as static means it is only visible to the file that the function or variable is defined as static in. But this would be better answered by a C guy and not me. C++ allows both C and C++ ways of declaring your variables as static because its completely backwards compatible with C.

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When you a declare a static variable at file scope, then that variable is only available in that particular file (technically, the *translation unit, but let's not complicate this too much). For example:

a.cpp

static int x = 7;

void printax()
{
    cout << "from a.cpp: x=" << x << endl;
}

b.cpp

static int x = 9;

void printbx()
{
    cout << "from b.cpp: x=" << x << endl;
}

main.cpp:

int main(int, char **)
{
    printax(); // Will print 7
    printbx(); // Will print 9

    return 0;
}

For a local variable, static means that the variable will be zero-initialized and retain its value between calls:

unsigned int powersoftwo()
{
    static unsigned lastpow;

    if(lastpow == 0)
        lastpow = 1;
    else
        lastpow *= 2;

    return lastpow;
}

int main(int, char **)
{
    for(int i = 0; i != 10; i++)
        cout << "2^" << i << " = " << powersoftwo() << endl;
}

For class variables, it means that there is only a single instance of that variable that is shared among all members of that class. Depending on permissions, the variable can be accessed from outside the class using its fully qualified name.

class Test
{
private:
    static char *xxx;

public:
    static int yyy;

public:
    Test()
    {        
        cout << this << "The static class variable xxx is at address "
             << static_cast<void *>(xxx) << endl;
        cout << this << "The static class variable yyy is at address "
             << static_cast<void *>(&y) << endl;
    }
};

// Necessary for static class variables.
char *Test::xxx = "I'm Triple X!";
int Test::yyy = 0;

int main(int, char **)
{
    Test t1;
    Test t2;

    Test::yyy = 666;

    Test t3;
};

Marking a non-class function as static makes the function only accessible from that file and inaccessible from other files.

a.cpp

static void printfilename()
{ // this is the printfilename from a.cpp - 
  // it can't be accessed from any other file
    cout << "this is a.cpp" << endl;
}

b.cpp

static void printfilename()
{ // this is the printfilename from b.cpp - 
  // it can't be accessed from any other file
    cout << "this is b.cpp" << endl;
}

For class member functions, marking them as static means that the function doesn't need to be called on a particular instance of an object (i.e. it doesn't have a this pointer).

class Test
{
private:
    static int count;

public:
    static int GetTestCount()
    {
        return count;
    };

    Test()
    {
        cout << this << "Created an instance of Test" << endl;
        count++;
    }

    ~Test()
    {
        cout << this << "Destroyed an instance of Test" << endl;
        count--;
    }
};

int Test::count = 0;

int main(int, char **)
{
    Test *arr[10] = { NULL };

    for(int i = 0; i != 10; i++)
        arr[i] = new Test();

    cout << "There are " << Test::GetTestCount << " instances of the Test class!" << endl;

    // now, delete them all except the first and last!
    for(int i = 1; i != 9; i++)
        delete arr[i];        

    cout << "There are " << Test::GetTestCount << " instances of the Test class!" << endl;

    delete arr[0];

    cout << "There are " << Test::GetTestCount << " instances of the Test class!" << endl;

    delete arr[9];

    cout << "There are " << Test::GetTestCount << " instances of the Test class!" << endl;

    return 0;
}
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