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I had a very hard time to find this bug where it seems field pos of class Icon hides class Element's pos field, only within the draw function.

case class Vector2(val x: Float, val y: Float) { ... }

abstract class Element(var pos: Vector2) {
    def draw(): Unit
}

class Icon(pos: Vector2, var texture: String) extends Element(pos) {
  override def draw() {
    ...
    GL11.glTranslatef(pos.x, pos.y, 0f)
    ...
  }
}

Later on:

// Create an icon with an initial position
val icon = new Icon(pos = Vector2(40,20), "crosshair")

// Draw all elements
elements.foreach{_.draw()} // => draws icon at (40,20)

// Setting a new position for icon
icon.pos = Vector2(100,200)

// See if it worked
Log.info(icon.pos.toString()) // => this prints Vector2(100,200)

// Draw all elements
elements.foreach{_.draw()} // => still draws icon at (40,20)

I've seen this post and I've tried:

  • Making the var abstract in the base class: this prevents me from setting a new pos to an Element
  • Renaming the constructor parameter (e.g. _pos): I won't do this because this will screw the API
  • Overriding the var in the derived class: only to be told by the compiler that I can't override a mutable variable

What's the way out ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just explicitly dereference this:

class Icon(pos: Vector2, var texture: String) extends Element(pos) {
  override def draw() {
    ...
    GL11.glTranslatef(this.pos.x, this.pos.y, 0f)
    ...
  }
}

Given that the shadowing only happens inside Icon, everywhere else (included in derived classes) you can keep using just pos (no need for this.pos).

UPDATE: No wait, this does not work! I'd call that a compiler bug. It seems that this.pos is treated as just pos even though they should not (IMHO) be the same thing. There is a simple workaround though:

class Icon(pos: Vector2) extends Element(pos) {
  private def self = this
  override def draw() {
    println(self.pos.x, self.pos.y, 0f)
  }
}

UPDATE 2: This is a reply to a comment, which would not fit in another comment.

Randall Schulz says:

I don't believe it's a bug.

Well it certainly looks like it is a bug, or at the very least an inconsistentcy for which I'd like to have a rationale.

The first thing to note is that in my work around above, self eq this. They really point to the very same reference, and in addition have the same static type. Then how come that self.pos and this.pos return two different things (regardless of what the "right" thing to return is)? In other word, self is an alias to this, and aliases should necessarily all behave the same.

Now, the reason why I think that this.pos should denote the variable in Element and not the parameter to Icon's constructor is simple. This parameter is not preceded with val and is thus really a mere parameter (not a val). As such it is accessible in class Icon only because of lexical scoping. It is not a member of Icon, not even a private one (the fact that under the hood a private field is generated does not change the semantics of the language). And if the pos parameter is not a member there is no reason that this.pos should return it. Obviously, this argument boils down to whether or not the parameter is also a member of the class. To me it clearly is not, but if in fact it supposed to automatically also be a member (I'm still looking in the spec for any mention of this) then it is indeed logical that self.pos returns the value of the parameter instead of the current value of the var in the base class (this still would not explain how self.pos and this.pos can mean a different thing though).

That's one of the reason self-types (the (usually) unconstrained variety that use a name other than this) exist.

Well, no. self-types are irrelevant. An unconstrained self-type just introduce an alias, so the alias points to the same reference as this (and if unconstrained, has the same static type). So using the alias should very much not change what is returned. And actually, it does not:

class Icon(pos: Vector2) extends Element(pos) { self =>
  override def draw() {
    println(self.pos.x, self.pos.y, 0f)
  }
}
val icon = new Icon(Vector2(1, 2))
icon.draw() // prints "(1.0,2.0,0.0)" as expected
icon.pos = Vector2(3, 4)
icon.draw() // oops, still prints "(1.0,2.0,0.0)"!

As you can see the self type did not help: self.pos still points to the parameter instead of the variable. To fix this you might be tempted to try to explictly type self as Element:

class Icon(pos: Vector2) extends Element(pos) { self: Element =>

But it does not change anything.

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Yep, now this works. Should someone fill a bug about this ? Thank you ! –  gsimard Mar 5 '13 at 23:27
    
Yes, a bug report seems warranted. Feel like doing it? At the very least, if it's expected behaviour we'll know it and maybe get a rationale. –  Régis Jean-Gilles Mar 5 '13 at 23:29
    
I don't believe it's a bug. That's one of the reason self-types (the (usually) unconstrained variety that use a name other than this) exist. –  Randall Schulz Mar 6 '13 at 1:08
    
Self-types are irrelevant. As I cannot do a proper reply in a comment, I made an update in my answer. –  Régis Jean-Gilles Mar 6 '13 at 10:31
    
Ah, I see why you think it's a bug... you think it's just a parameter, not a field! Well, not true -- if you refer to it anywhere other than parameter to super classes or val initializations in the body, it will be "promoted" to a private field. That includes calling it as this.pos. –  Daniel C. Sobral Mar 6 '13 at 13:18

Constructor parameters are visible in a class body, that's just how things work. It is weird to have a private val shadow a public var, I grant you, but that's that. In the particular snippet you showed, you can do this:

abstract class Element {
  def pos: Vector2
  def pos_=(x: Vector2): Unit
  def draw(): Unit
}

and then

class Icon(var pos: Vector2, var texture: String) extends Element {
  override def draw() {
    ...
    GL11.glTranslatef(pos.x, pos.y, 0f)
    ...
  }
}

But it won't help if you just want to initialize Element with a value, instead of declaring a var on whatever is extending Element. My own advice is to avoid var on constructors, use something like initialPos, and initialize the var in the body.

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Be aware that reference to a (non-property, i.e. non-val, non-var) constructor parameter outside the constructor body (which means inside a method body) will force the compiler to copy that constructor parameter to a (private) field. So instance size can be subtly increased. –  Randall Schulz Mar 6 '13 at 1:10
    
@Daniel C. Sobral: I think the main problem with the initialPos solution is that you are chnaging the API: now when instantiating Icon using named parameters, we have to use the ugly name initialPos inseatd of just pos. Also, you talk about a private val. There is no private val here, just a parameter that is accessible through simple lexical scoping. AT least that's how I have always seen it, if the spec says otherwise I'd appreciate a pointer. –  Régis Jean-Gilles Mar 6 '13 at 10:35
    
@RégisJean-Gilles Any constructor parameter that is referred to by methods in the class is treated as a private val. You can confirm it with javap, but I'll leave reference-hunting to someone else. –  Daniel C. Sobral Mar 6 '13 at 13:13
    
I know that it creates a private field in the (jvm) class. But this is an implementation detail and thus irrelevant to the expected semantics. Other than this implementation detail, the only thing that makes it look like it's a val is that you can access it in the whole scope of the class. But it is true also of any value defined in the outer scope of the class, and so to me the fact that you can access the parameter in the class is just an effect of lexical scoping. –  Régis Jean-Gilles Mar 6 '13 at 13:19
    
@RégisJean-Gilles Well, your perception is wrong, as evidenced by it failing to match your expectations. A constructor parameter is a field. If not declared val, it will be private. What is an implementation detail is that it can not be part of the class under certain circumstances. –  Daniel C. Sobral Mar 6 '13 at 13:22

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