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I found a code example here: N-QUEEN Backtracking problem solved

It shows this code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

/** this is the size of chess board */
#define N 8

/** Given a completed board, this prints it to the stdout */
void print_solution(int state[N][N])
{
    int i,j;
    for (i = 0; i < N; ++i)
    {
        for (j = 0; j < N; ++j)
            cout << state[i][j] << " ";
        cout << endl;
    }
    cout << endl;
}

/** return true if placing a queen on [row][col] is acceptable
else return false */
bool accept(int state[N][N], int row, int col)
{
    int i,j;

    /* check the column */
    for (i = 0; i < N; ++i)
    {
        if (state[row][i])
            return false;
    }

    /* check the row */
    for (i = 0; i < N; ++i)
    {
        if (state[i][col])
            return false;
    }

    /* check the upper left diagnol */
    for (i = row, j = col; i >= 0 && j >= 0; i--, j--)
    {
        if (state[i][j])
            return false;
    }

    /* check the lower left diagnol */
    for (i = row, j = col; i < N && j >= 0; ++i, --j)
    {
        if (state[i][j])
            return false;
    }

    /* check the upper right diagnol */
    for (i = row, j = col; i >= 0 && j < N; i--, ++j)
    {
        if (state[i][j])
            return false;
    }

    /* check the lower right diagnol */
    for (i = row, j = col; i < N && j < N; ++i, ++j)
    {
        if (state[i][j])
            return false;
    }

    /* return true if all tests passed */
    return true;
}

void solve_state(int state[N][N], int row)
{

    int i;

    /* if all queens have been placed at non conflicting positions */
    if (row == N)
    {

        print_solution(state);
        return;
    }

    /* Place queens on all positions in a given row and
    check if the state is acceptable
    Continue the process till all possibilities found */
    for(i=0; i<N; ++i){

        if(accept(state, row, i)){
            state[row][i] = 1;
            solve_state(state, row+1);
        }
        state[row][i] = 0;
    }
}

int main()
{
    /* initialise the board */
    int state[N][N] = {0};

    solve_state (state, 0);

    return 0;
}

I fail rather hard with logic and I have even more trouble trying to learn recursion and such. What really ticks me off is that I just cannot comprehend why this code loops through all the 92 solutions of the 8 queens in chess problem. At first I thought it only found one solution but I was surprised once I tested the code and it ran all the possible solutions.

I must be missing something very basic here because I've even attempted to make it "stop" after just one solution but I just fail.

So I suppose what I am asking here is that in order to understand this, given this code, if I just wanted it to loop through once, and find the first solution, what would need to be changed? What kind of sorcery makes this thing loop all these times?!

share|improve this question
3  
There are so very many programs out there that will auto-indent c++ code for you. –  Rollie Mar 5 '13 at 23:04
1  
You really shouldn't be that lazy: if you format the code as expected you might get more 'readers' and a good answer. –  rokjarc Mar 5 '13 at 23:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The first step to understanding a recursive method is to verbalize what the method does, like this:

/** solve_state(state, n) finds all possible solutions given a state where
 * the first n rows already have legally placed queens
 */

Then examine the body of the method and verbalize it:

/**
 * if n == N we're done, there is a queen in every row.  print the solution.
 * otherwise for every legal spot in the current row, 
 * put a queen there, and then solve the remaining rows.
 */

One very easy way to have the program exit after printing one solution is to throw an exception after printing the solution.

Or, perhaps more elegantly, you could modify solve_state to return 1 when it finds a solution, and stop the recursion that way:

int solve_state(int state[N][N], int row)
{
    int i;

    /* if all queens have been placed at non conflicting positions */
    if (row == N)
    {
        print_solution(state);
        return 1; // done!
    }

    /* Place queens on all positions in a given row and
       check if the state is acceptable
       Continue the process till all possibilities found */
    for(i=0; i<N; ++i){
        if(accept(state, row, i)){
            state[row][i] = 1;
            if (solve_state(state, row+1)) return 1;
        }
        state[row][i] = 0;
    }

    return 0; // not yet
}
share|improve this answer
/* Place queens on all positions in a given row and
check if the state is acceptable
Continue the process till all possibilities found */
for(i=0; i<N; ++i){

    if(accept(state, row, i)){
        state[row][i] = 1;
        solve_state(state, row+1);
    }
    state[row][i] = 0;
}

This loop does exactly what you described. You are looping on the eight column of a row, thus giving the eight possibilities. If you want to stop on the first acceptable state, you have to update the inner condition and remove the recursive call. Instead you can call your print_solution function to print the result.

This gives you something like:

for(i=0; i<N; ++i){

    if(accept(state, row, i)){
        state[row][i] = 1;
        print_solution(state);
        return; // this prevents printing the solution multiple times
                // in case the queen may be placed on other colum on the same row
    }
    state[row][i] = 0;
}

Side note: for me this code is a C code (variables declared at the beginning of the functions, plain old C arrays, use of int where a bool would do the job), and the only C++ part is the use of std::cout and std::endl in the print_solution function, which can easily be replaced by a good-old printf.

share|improve this answer
    
Your code doesn't even begin to work. You have removed the recursion. It just prints the first partial solution (one queen in position 1 in row 1) and exits. –  kevin cline Mar 6 '13 at 1:25
    
" I just wanted it to loop through once, and find the first solution, what would need to be changed?" -> my code stops after the first solution, no ? –  Geoffroy Mar 6 '13 at 7:02
    
No. To generate a solution requires recursive descent into solve_state N times. accept(state, row, i) just checks whether a queen can be placed into row row in position i. So your function returns after putting a Queen in the first position in the first row. –  kevin cline Mar 7 '13 at 1:24
    
You know that you can place a lot of additional recursion if you want ? –  Geoffroy Mar 7 '13 at 7:02
    
Did you try running this code? –  kevin cline Mar 7 '13 at 14:48

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