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Crockford introduces a pattern in the deentityify method to create a module. He claims:

The module pattern takes advantage of function scope and close to create relationships that are binding and private. In this example, only the deentityify method has access to the entity data structure.

Distilling to remove his custom functions, I think the code boils down to...

String.prototype.deentityify = function() {
    var entity = { 
        quot: '"',
        lt: '<',
        gt: '>'
    };

    return function() {
        return this.replace(/&([^&;]+);/g, function(a, b) {
            var r = entity[b];
            return typeof r === 'string' ? r : a;
        });  //close function(a,b)
    }; //close the returned function
} /* close  top level */ (); /* but evaluate it so deentitify becomes the returned fcn(!)

Problem is I don't see why this additional layer of indirection is necessary. Is this code not equivalent?

String.prototype.deentityify = function() {
    var entity = { 
        quot: '"',
        lt: '<',
        gt: '>'
    };

//    return function() {
        return this.replace(/&([^&;]+);/g, function(a, b) {
            var r = entity[b];
            return typeof r === 'string' ? r : a;
        });  //close function(a,b)
//    }; //close the returned function
} /* close  top level, don't evaluate
share|improve this question
    
Re: your edit comment "(Sidenote: I don't know where to actually have this discussion outside of edit notes!)" You can discuss things like that on meta.stackoverflow.com –  Kyle Trauberman Apr 30 '13 at 18:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The basic reason for this pattern is to avoid re-evaluating entity on every call. Replace entity with something that is expensive to construct and doesn't change from call to call:

String.prototype.deentityify = function() {
    // expensiveFunctionCall is called *once* - when the function is defined.
    var entity = expensiveFunctionCall();

    return function() {
        return this.replace(/&([^&;]+);/g, function(a, b) {
            var r = entity[b];
            return typeof r === 'string' ? r : a;
        });  //close function(a,b)
    }; //close the returned function
}();

vs

String.prototype.deentityify = function() {
    // expensiveFunctionCall is called
    // *every time* "anyString".deentityify() is called.
    var entity = expensiveFunctionCall();

    return this.replace(/&([^&;]+);/g, function(a, b) {
        var r = entity[b];
        return typeof r === 'string' ? r : a;
    });  //close function(a,b)
};
share|improve this answer
    
So it's as if String has a private instance variable entity that is used by deentityify, and furthermore is private to that function only. –  djechlin Mar 6 '13 at 1:43
    
@djechlin - correct. –  Sean Vieira Mar 6 '13 at 2:12

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