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I was going through a library of a javascript plugin which was using this syntax. what does the following statement means syntactically in JavaScript

simpleCart = function (options) {
    },$engine,cartColumnViews;

later the code uses simpleCart in many places. What does simpleCart refer to at the end of the statement.

EDIT1 : http://simplecartjs.org/assets/js/simpleCart-latest.php search for "main simpleCart object"

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Can you link to the source code? –  gdoron Mar 6 '13 at 1:45
    
Preceded by var: jsfiddle.net/p9tEg. Without var: jsfiddle.net/p9tEg/1 –  Tim Medora Mar 6 '13 at 1:48
    
Are you missing the var? –  epascarello Mar 6 '13 at 1:51
    
Without the var on that fiddle p9tEg/1 I get an error message in the console: ReferenceError: $engine is not defined –  Stephen P Mar 6 '13 at 1:54
    
@gdoron i have added the link to the source code –  David Mar 6 '13 at 23:37

3 Answers 3

My psychic powers tell me there's a var just before that (or just before a list of other values before that).

var a,b=2,c;

will define a, b and c, and set b to 2. So the code you found is setting simpleCart to a function, and defining $engine and cartColumnViews for future use (see the comments for really deep JavaScript details which are beyond the scope of this question!).

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Assuming there is a var at the start, the OP code creates all the variables first, then assigns a function to simpleCart since declarations are processed before any code is executed. ;-) –  RobG Mar 6 '13 at 2:08
    
well what do you know, seems it is. I had to make a jsfiddle to convince myself: jsfiddle.net/sfZPX/1 –  Dave Mar 6 '13 at 2:11
    
well the answer is still valid anyway! –  Dave Mar 6 '13 at 2:12
    
Yes, no down–vote, just a nit-pick. –  RobG Mar 6 '13 at 2:16

That's very strange code, but the function and the $engine don't do anything so the result is essentially the same as simpleCart = cartColumnViews.

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It's only "not correct" if there's a var we haven't been told about. The OP specifically said they were comma operators, so I went with it. –  Niet the Dark Absol Mar 6 '13 at 1:49
    
Practically it's the same as throw 'referenceError: $engine is not defined'. :-) –  RobG Mar 6 '13 at 2:13

I'm assuming it is variable declaration. simpleCart is variable that function assigned to it.

Better reference here: JavaScript: var functionName = function() {} vs function functionName() {}

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