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Basically I don't know what I need to do to accomplish this..

I have two loops that will loop for different durations each:

import time

while True:
    print "Hello Matt"
    time.sleep(5)

and then another loop:

import time

while True:
    print "Hello world"
    time.sleep(1)

I need to incorporate both loops in a program and both need to run at the same time and process data independently, and there is no need to share data between them. I guess I'm looking for Threads or Multiprocessing but I'm not sure how to implement it for something like this.

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1  
Look at the examples (the second one): docs.python.org/2/library/multiprocessing.html#examples –  Blender Mar 6 '13 at 1:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The use of Thread is enough for your purpose:

import time
from threading import Thread

def foo():
    while True:
        print "Hello Matt"
        time.sleep(5)

def bar():
    while True:
        print "Hello world"
        time.sleep(1)

a = Thread(target=foo)
b = Thread(target=bar)
a.start()
b.start()
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Very awesome, both extremely valid answers. Going with this one because it seems much cleaner. Question.. is there any harm in consolidating the last four lines into two by added .start() to the end of the two threads above them? –  Matthew Mar 6 '13 at 2:07
    
@Matthew Glad it helped. There is no problem with calling start() directly, as long as you don't need the reference to the object (e.g., if you are not going to use another method). For your example, it is completely valid. –  A. Rodas Mar 6 '13 at 2:12
    
I see that you .start() the thread. Is there ever a need to .stop() a thread? Garbage collection? –  Matthew Mar 6 '13 at 2:15
    
@Matthew No, a thread finishes or is abruptly stopped - there is no stop() method. They aren't deleted by garbage collection, even there's always list of all active Threads in threading.enumerate. If you want to finish one of the previous threads, use a boolean variable instead of True in the while loop, and change the value of the flag when you want to stop it. –  A. Rodas Mar 6 '13 at 2:24
    
Very very awesome. I guess the only issue I'm running into now is that if I a variable as True within a thread, another thread isn't seeing that the variable is true now. Do you need an example?? –  Matthew Mar 6 '13 at 14:55

To do that you can use the module threading, like this:

import threading
import time

def f(n, str):     # define a function with the arguments n and str
    while True:
        print str
        time.sleep(n)

t1=threading.Thread(target=f, args=(1, "Hello world"))    # create the 1st thread
t1.start()                                                # start it

t2=threading.Thread(target=f, args=(5, "Hello Matt"))     # create the 2nd thread
t2.start()                                                # start it

ref.
http://docs.python.org/2/library/threading.html

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