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I came across this piece of code in our SW which relies on destructor to release a Lock. However when I ran the program, the destructor never got called and lock never got released.

bool someClass::someFunc()
{
    Locker lock(m_lock); //take lock in constructor, release lock in Locker destructor
    return something;
}

What's going wrong here? could compiler be optimizing this function to be inline ?

class Locker {
  public: 
      Locker(Lock& lock) : m_lock(lock) { m_lock.lock(); }
     ~Locker() { m_lock.unlock(); } 
  protected: 
    Lock& m_lock;
}
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closed as too localized by jogojapan, sgarizvi, Yogesh Suthar, Fabian Kreiser, slugster Mar 6 '13 at 7:33

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8  
How do you know the destructor was never called? Can you give a complete, minimal repro? –  SirPentor Mar 6 '13 at 1:58
2  
Unless your program used a special system call to exit (i.e. _exit()), this is nearly impossible because C++ is the king of RAII. Please post a minimal working code example that demonstrates the problem. –  user405725 Mar 6 '13 at 1:59
3  
This is basic RAII, destructor will be called.. –  Karthik T Mar 6 '13 at 1:59
2  
Please provide a complete, compileable source listing that demonstrates the problem. –  Benjamin Lindley Mar 6 '13 at 2:08
1  
The destructor is called. –  user334856 Mar 6 '13 at 2:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Are you sure the Locker actually releases the lock in the destructor? You can count on a destructor being called unless the program crashes or aborts or some other unusual circumstance occurs. Perhaps your debugger is showing the wrong values?

If the compiler optimizes it inline, the code will still be executed. "inline" doesn't mean the code is never ran.

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class Locker { public: Locker(Lock& lock) : m_lock(lock) { m_lock.lock(); } ~Locker() { m_lock.unlock(); } protected: Lock& m_lock; –  ddahuja Mar 6 '13 at 2:04
    
What indications are you having that it's not being unlocked? Sometimes your debugger shows inaccurate information - can you output some text in the destructor to test if it's being called? C++ should call that destructor. –  Jamin Grey Mar 6 '13 at 2:07
1  
my only doubt was if inlining would prevent object going out of scope, I verified by small example even with inlining destructor is called. So more debugging in business logic !! Thanks All for your answers. –  ddahuja Mar 6 '13 at 2:43

I suspect your observation that the destructor is not called is wrong. Here's how to prove it once and for all:

#include<iostream>

class Locker {
  public: 
      Locker(Lock& lock) : m_lock(lock) { m_lock.lock(); std::cout<<"locked\n"; }
     ~Locker() { m_lock.unlock(); std::cout<<"unlocked\n"; } 
  protected: 
    Lock& m_lock;
}

Ofcourse, this is just to satisfy yourself that the destructor is being called. Don't leave the lines in there :)

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