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For a table that holds the records of user's webpages visiting behavior, how can I select users that visit more than one webpages.

The structure of this tables is:

userId        webpageId       visitTime
  0              123            ...
  0              124            ...
  1              123            ...
 ...             ...            ...

I can count using:

SELECT userId, COUNT(DISTINCT webpageId) AS count FROM visits GROUP BY userId;

It gives me the result like:

userId          count
  0               2
  1               1
  2               6
 ...             ...

How can I excute query that gives me the final result like:

userId
  0
  2
 ...

each is user that visit more than one DISTINCT webpages

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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

just add having clause

SELECT userId, COUNT(DISTINCT webpageId) AS count 
FROM visits 
GROUP BY userId
HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT webpageId) > 1

but if you only what the ID

SELECT userId
FROM visits 
GROUP BY userId
HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT webpageId) > 1

the reason why you are filtering on HAVING clause and not on WHERE is because, WHERE clause cannot support columns that where aggregated.

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exactly! Where doesn't work for GROUP, Having does! –  zoujyjs Mar 6 '13 at 2:15
    
btw: Can I use alias 'count' in HAVING clause? –  zoujyjs Mar 6 '13 at 2:19
    
@zoujyjs yes HAVING clause supports alias already.. see here sqlfiddle.com/#!2/049e0/4 –  John Woo Mar 6 '13 at 2:21
    
Thanks for your patience! –  zoujyjs Mar 6 '13 at 2:28
    
you're welcome :D glad it helped. –  John Woo Mar 6 '13 at 2:50

Try this:

SELECT userId, COUNT(DISTINCT webpageId) AS count FROM visits GROUP BY userId
having COUNT(DISTINCT webpageId) > 1

More: HAVING

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THX! that works! –  zoujyjs Mar 6 '13 at 2:15

While HAVING is a good approach in this case, remember that queries can be nested:

SELECT userId, pageCount
FROM (
    SELECT userId, COUNT(DISTINCT webpageId) AS pageCount
    FROM visits 
    GROUP BY userId) AS n
WHERE pageCount > 1

The actual query plans may differ, especially if HAVING is an optimized case, but there is no reason why the plans must be different. (Compare plans on the specific RDBMS/version if it is an issue or concern.)

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