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This feels really basic; I'm sorry for that.

Consider

trait Foo[+T] { def t : T }  
trait Bar[+S,+T] extends Foo[T] { def s : S }  
trait Baz[+S,T] extends Foo[T] { def s : S }

Does the covariance of T in Foo automatically apply to Baz, even though T in Baz is not marked as covariant? Will there be any meaningful distinction between the behavior of Bar and Baz?

(Playing around, the two forms seem hard to distinguish. If they are identical, somehow it feels dirty that the Baz form doesn't warn or signal an error, as looking at Baz alone you'd expect T not to be variant.)

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The compiler will definitely enforce the variance as specified and you won't be able to use any generic class (i.e., values bearing its type parameters) in a manner inconsistent with their variance. –  Randall Schulz Mar 6 '13 at 2:53
    
Thanks! (I think I get it; see comment to answer below, if you want to understand what confused me.) –  Steve Waldman Mar 6 '13 at 2:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No, Baz[T] will not inherit the covariance of Foo[+T]. Covariance has to be marked explicitly. Here's an example,

class Foo[+T] {}
class Baz[T] extends Foo[T] {}

(new Foo[String]) : Foo[Any] // Ok: Foo[+T] is covariant
(new Baz[String]) : Foo[Any] // Ok: Baz[String] <: Foo[String] <: Foo[Any]
(new Baz[String]) : Baz[Any] // Error: Baz[T] is invariant in type T
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Thanks! I think I see my confusion. The variance is neither overridden nor inherited -- it just stays with the type Foo but has nothing to do with the subtype Baz. So a Baz[String] conforms to Foo[Any], but it does not conform to Baz[Any]. I didn't consider this possibility: I presumed if it remained covariant in Foo, it would also be covariant in Baz too. I'll have to revise some misguided intuitions about inheritance. –  Steve Waldman Mar 6 '13 at 2:53
    
Right. Subclassing covariant Foo with invariant Baz cannot remove the covariance of Foo. –  Kipton Barros Mar 6 '13 at 2:59

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