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I have this:

    SELECT BRAND_ID, CAST (ROUND (AVG(PROD_PRICE), 2) AS NUMERIC (9, 2)) AS 'LARGEST AVERAGE'
    FROM LGPRODUCT
    GROUP BY BRAND_ID

and it displays a bunch of average prices, per brand, just like it's supposed to.

But what if I only want to display the highest number? Or the lowest?

I have been trying to use MAX in all kinds of different ways and have tried using WHERE and HAVING.

What am I missing?

share|improve this question
    
What RDBMS you are using? RDBMS stands for Relational Database Management System. RDBMS is the basis for SQL, and for all modern database systems like MS SQL Server, IBM DB2, Oracle, MySQL, etc... – John Woo Mar 6 '13 at 4:19
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since you have mentions the RDBMS, the query below will work on most rdbms.

SELECT  BRAND_ID, 
        CAST (ROUND (AVG(PROD_PRICE), 2) AS NUMERIC (9, 2)) AS 'LARGEST AVERAGE'
FROM    LGPRODUCT
GROUP   BY BRAND_ID
HAVING  CAST (ROUND (AVG(PROD_PRICE), 2) AS NUMERIC (9, 2)) =
        (
            SELECT  MAX(xx)
            FROM
            (
                SELECT  CAST (ROUND (AVG(PROD_PRICE), 2) AS NUMERIC (9, 2)) as xx
                FROM    LGPRODUCT
                GROUP   BY BRAND_ID
            ) s
        )

one advantage of the query above, is it handles duplicates (BRAND_IDs having the largest average)

share|improve this answer
    
That did it, thank you. I knew it would be something simple. – madtroll Mar 6 '13 at 4:51
    
maybe it could be simplier if you can tell me the database server you are using :D – John Woo Mar 6 '13 at 5:34

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