Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following code to find the maximum value

int length = 2000;
float *data;
// data is allocated and initialized

float max = 0.0;
for(int i = 0; i < length; i++)
{
   if(data[i] > max)
   {
      max = data;
   }
}

I tried vectorizing it by using SSE3 intrinsics, but I am kind of struck on how I should do the comparison.

int length = 2000;
float *data;
// data is allocated and initialized

float max = 0.0;
// for time being just assume that length is always mod 4
for(int i = 0; i < length; i+=4)
{
  __m128 a = _mm_loadu_ps(data[i]);
  __m128 b = _mm_load1_ps(max);

  __m128 gt = _mm_cmpgt_ps(a,b);

  // Kinda of struck on what to do next
}

Can anyone give some idea on it.

share|improve this question
1  
If we look at the code's actual meaning, we see that it's the same as stackoverflow.com/questions/9877700/… –  John Zwinck Mar 6 '13 at 4:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

So your code finds the largest value in a fixed-length array of floats. OK.

There is _mm_max_ps, which gives you the pairwise maxima from two vectors of four floats each. So how about this?

int length = 2000;
float *data; // maybe you should just use the SSE type here to avoid copying later
// data is allocated and initialized

// for time being just assume that length is always mod 4
__m128 max = _mm_loadu_ps(data); // load the first 4
for(int i = 4; i < length; i+=4)
{
  __m128 cur = _mm_loadu_ps(data + i);
  max = _mm_max_ps(max, cur);
}

Finally, grab the largest of the four values in max (see Getting max value in a __m128i vector with SSE? for that).

It should work this way:

Step 1:

[43, 29, 58, 94] (this is max)
[82, 83, 10, 88]
[19, 39, 85, 77]

Step 2:

[82, 83, 58, 94] (this is max)
[19, 39, 85, 77]

Step 2:

[82, 83, 85, 94] (this is max)
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you...... –  veda Mar 6 '13 at 4:47
    
You're welcome. I'd love to see some benchmarks when you're done. :) –  John Zwinck Mar 6 '13 at 5:03
    
Shouldn't it be: for(int i = 4; i < length; i+=4) ? –  Paul R Mar 6 '13 at 7:54
    
@JohnZwinck "I'd love to see some benchmarks when you're done" - Will probably be a bad surprise, since unaligned moves are some of the worst things you can do with SSE. –  Christian Rau Mar 6 '13 at 8:14
    
@Christian: unaligned loads are not such a big problem on recent Intel CPUs (e.g. Core i3, i5, i7). –  Paul R Mar 6 '13 at 9:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.