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I have extracted the data from a csv file, starting from specific rows and columns using this code:

def csvread(csvpath, filtered_dict):
    rdr = csv.reader(open(csvpath, 'rb'))
    columns = [{key:row[pos[0][1]] for key,pos in filtered_dict.items()} for row in rdr]
    # finally trim to desired row startpoints:
    data = {key:[col[key] for col in columns[pos[0][0]:]] for key,pos in  filtered_dict.items()}
    return zip(*data.values())

filtered_dict seems like this:

{'Date': [(21, 5)], 'Rate': [(21, 4)], 'Item': [(21, 2)]}

but it extracts the data up to the end of csv file, which results in a problem for processing the required data. Like this:

[('Dates', 'Rates', 'Items'),
 ('2013/03/07', '$114', 'Tissot'),
 ('2013/03/07', '$140', 'Adidas'),
 ('2013/03/07', '$344', 'Nike'),
 ('', '', ''),
 ('', '', ''),
 ('','The rate for EVERY item is FIXED', 'No RETURN or EXCHANGE!')]

Now what I want is to HALT the process if the Function finds ALL 3 fields EMPTY. and must result like this:

[('Dates', 'Rates', 'Items'),
 ('2013/03/07', '$114', 'Tissot'),
 ('2013/03/07', '$140', 'Adidas'),
 ('2013/03/07', '$344', 'Nike')]

Thanks in Advance for Help.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can check if all the elements of a list of strings have zero length by testing if they have zero length when they are all joined together. This seems to give you what you want:

di = [('Dates', 'Rates', 'Items'),
      ('2013/03/07', '$114', 'Tissot'),
      ('2013/03/07', '$140', 'Adidas'),
      ('2013/03/07', '$344', 'Nike'),
      ('', '', ''),
      ('', '', ''),
      ('','The rate for EVERY item is FIXED', 'No RETURN or EXCHANGE!')]

d2 = []
for x in di:
    if len(''.join(x)) == 0:
        break
    else:
        d2.append(x)

print (d2)

... which outputs:

[('Dates', 'Rates', 'Items'), ('2013/03/07', '$114', 'Tissot'), ('2013/03/07', '
$140', 'Adidas'), ('2013/03/07', '$344', 'Nike')]
share|improve this answer
    
See the other answer for a better solution that uses any() instead of the string join. My testing shows that the code using any() runs in about 40% less time than the code using the join() for the above test case. –  Simon Mar 6 '13 at 19:17

A problem with the previously-suggested answer is that the test if len(''.join(x)) == 0: in the most-common case does a lot of work joining up strings, and does a small amount of work only for the terminating case, where all the strings are empty.

It is better to arrange things to do a small amount of work for the most-common case, where the first string of a tuple isn't empty, or the second isn't empty, or the third isn't. This can be tested for with the builtin function any(), which short circuits (quits testing) as soon as it finds a string that isn't empty, so it does a lot less work and is cleaner code to boot.

di = [('Dates', 'Rates', 'Items'),
      ('2013/03/07', '$114', 'Tissot'),
      ('2013/03/07', '$140', 'Adidas'),
      ('2013/03/07', '$344', 'Nike'),
      ('', '', ''),
      ('', '', ''),
      ('','The rate for EVERY item is FIXED', 'No RETURN or EXCHANGE!')]

d2 = []
for x in di:
    if any(x):
        d2.append(x)
    else:
        break

print (d2)

Output:

[('Dates', 'Rates', 'Items'),
 ('2013/03/07', '$114', 'Tissot'),
 ('2013/03/07', '$140', 'Adidas'),
 ('2013/03/07', '$344', 'Nike')]
share|improve this answer
    
+1: A much better solution, which I'll now try to remember! –  Simon Mar 6 '13 at 19:09

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