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I create an Encryption class to encryt/decrypt binary data in my Android project, by this link.

package com.my.package;

import java.security.SecureRandom;

import javax.crypto.Cipher;
import javax.crypto.KeyGenerator;
import javax.crypto.SecretKey;
import javax.crypto.spec.SecretKeySpec;

// TODO Incomplete class
public class Encryption {

    private static final byte[] salt = { (byte) 0xA4, (byte) 0x0B, (byte) 0xC8,
            (byte) 0x34, (byte) 0xD6, (byte) 0x95, (byte) 0xF3, (byte) 0x13 };

    private static int BLOCKS = 128;

    private static byte[] encrypt(byte[] raw, byte[] clear) throws Exception {
        SecretKeySpec skeySpec = new SecretKeySpec(raw, "AES");
        Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES");
        cipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, skeySpec);
        byte[] encrypted = cipher.doFinal(clear);
        return encrypted;
    }

    private static byte[] decrypt(byte[] raw, byte[] encrypted)
            throws Exception {
        SecretKeySpec skeySpec = new SecretKeySpec(raw, "AES");
        Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES");
        cipher.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, skeySpec);
        byte[] decrypted = cipher.doFinal(encrypted);
        return decrypted;
    }

    private static byte[] getKey() throws Exception {
        byte[] keyStart = "this is a key".getBytes();
        KeyGenerator kgen = KeyGenerator.getInstance("AES");
        SecureRandom sr = SecureRandom.getInstance("SHA1PRNG");
        sr.setSeed(keyStart);
        kgen.init(128, sr); // 192 and 256 bits may not be available
        SecretKey skey = kgen.generateKey();
        byte[] key = skey.getEncoded();
        return key;
    }

    public static void test() {
        String test = "My Name Is Dragon Warrior";

        byte[] e = null;
        try {
            e = encrypt(getKey(), test.getBytes());
        } catch (Exception e1) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e1.printStackTrace();
        }
        byte[] d = null;
        try {
            d = decrypt(getKey(), e);
        } catch (Exception e1) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e1.printStackTrace();
        }
        System.out.println(new String(d));
    }
}

Then I run the code in main activity:

public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    // ...
    Encryption.test();
    // ...
}

Then I get a BadPaddingException when the following code is being executed in test():

try {
    d = decrypt(getKey(), e);
} catch (Exception e1) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e1.printStackTrace();
}

The funny thing is that I created a Java project other than Android project. And the code is running just fine without any exception.

What's wrong with my code?

share|improve this question
    
I have absolutely no idea about that but I googled out and find this link: stackoverflow.com/questions/4874311/… Hope it will help you. and this link: stackoverflow.com/questions/8387345/… –  Maulik Mar 6 '13 at 6:18
    
I can confirm the code executes correctly outside of Android (Java 7). –  Duncan Mar 6 '13 at 7:53
    
BadPaddingException usually means the wrong key is used to decrypt the data. This could be caused if getKey() is returning different values on each invocation. Have you tried a test in Android where you call getKey() just once and store the result? There is no good reason why the results should differ, but it's an interesting test. –  Duncan Mar 6 '13 at 7:54
    
Other commments: your getKey() method should return a SecretKey object. No need to extract the bytes, only to then reform them as a SecretKeySpec in the encryption/decryption methods. –  Duncan Mar 6 '13 at 7:55
    
Exactly, I get different key everytime I call getKey(). How can I get a immutable key? Is it safe? –  Dragon warrior Mar 6 '13 at 15:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

"SHA1PRNG" is not a key derivation function, and the implementation may differ across providers. Please use a correct KDF such as PBKDF2 for passwords. "This is a key" is not a key, it is a string.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you mean I should use PBKDF2 instead of SHA1PRNG? –  Dragon warrior Mar 6 '13 at 12:42
    
Precisely, that's the point. –  owlstead Mar 6 '13 at 13:46
    
I replace SecureRandom sr = SecureRandom.getInstance("SHA1PRNG") with SecureRandom sr = SecureRandom.getInstance("PBKDF2"). Then I get NoSuchAlgorithmException –  Dragon warrior Mar 6 '13 at 14:48
    
Look for PBKDF2 and Java on this site, PBKDF2is not a pseudo random function. –  owlstead Mar 6 '13 at 16:05

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