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Here's a list of RGB values from a file called 'colors.txt'

255 222 0  
101 153 255  
255 153 0  
13  112 84  
13  112 84  
255 222 0  
13  112 84  
9   112 84  

I can use an awk array to get the 5 unique RGB combinations from the file with

awk '{arr[($1","$2","$3)]} END {for (i in arr) print i}' colors.txt

This gives:

9,112,84  
255,222,0  
13,112,84  
255,153,0  
101,153,255  

Notice that these aren't in the order they were in the input file. However, this command

awk 'arr[($1","$2","$3)]++==0 {print ($1","$2","$3)}' colors.txt

255,222,0  
101,153,255  
255,153,0  
13,112,84  
9,112,84  

preserves the order. How exactly does this work? I found the second command version here.

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3 Answers 3

This line:

awk '{arr[($1","$2","$3)]} END {for (i in arr) print i}' colors.txt

prints the hash after you read all the input, and since hash keys do not preserve the order the output is quite arbitrary.

This command:

awk 'arr[($1","$2","$3)]++==0 {print ($1","$2","$3)}' colors.txt

Checks if the same combination was previously printed using a hash, however, it immediately prints the input if arr[($1","$2","$3)] is zero. So, there is no order preservation. It is more like immediate printing.

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Many thanks, perreal! –  user2138595 Mar 6 '13 at 6:45

Just for fun, one could combine it into an awkish:

awk '!A[$1=$1,$2,$3]++' OFS=, file
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+1 for conciseness :) –  Dimitre Radoulov Mar 6 '13 at 11:33
    
Thanks Radoulov :) –  Scrutinizer Mar 8 '13 at 2:12

perreal has explained why the order is preserved, I wanted to touch on some of the finer points of this idiom:

  • If only one array occurs in the script, I tend to use the name hash or h for it to remind myself of its type.
  • Comma separated array subscripts already work as expected in gawk and nawk, i.e. h[$1,$2,$3] becomes h[$1 SUBSEP $2 SUBSEP $3]. The default value of SUBSEP is \034 or 0x1c.
  • I find !h[...]++ more readable than h[...]++==0, maybe that's just me.
  • I prefer using OFS over explicit printing, i.e. $1=$1; print over print ($1","$2","$3).

All these taken together:

awk '!h[$1,$2,$3]++ { $1=$1; print }' OFS=',' colors.txt
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In that situation I name my array "seen" to represent what it's being used for (i.e. a test of whether or not the index has been seen before) rather than "hash" representing how it's stored. So I'd use !seen[$1,$2,$3]++ but nbd either way. +1 for !array[index]++ and use of OFS. –  Ed Morton Mar 6 '13 at 13:27

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