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p b #undefined local variable or method b for main:Object
a = nil
if a and (b=3)
  do_something_with b
end
p b # nil

Why is b getting the value nil after the execution of if block, while expected result would be undefined local variable or method b for main:Object, Does Ruby initialize all the variables to nil in the memory beforehand ?

The same case with the following code

if nil
  bb = 10
end
p bb # nil

someone please throw some light on how ruby initializes the variables and what is going on in this case, Thanks

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is a pretty good reference on Ruby variables. From the relevant section on local variables:

"[A local variable] is initialized if it appears on the left‐hand side (before the equals sign (U+003D)) of an assignment expression, even if the expression does not actually execute. Variables of the latter sort have the value nil."

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Link is not working anymore. –  Niko Nyman Apr 5 at 19:17
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Well for one in your code:

p b #undefined local variable or method b for main:Object
a = nil
if a and (b=3)
  do_something_with b
end
p b # nil

You never do anything with b, as you have never given it a value, therefore, the if statement will never execute because it is looking for b to have a value of 3, and it doesn't.

With your second set of code, again, you never enter into the loop and thus don't set the value. However, since it has been defined, it will have a nil value.

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yes it doesnot enter the loop, but unlike other languages say Javascript, executing (false && (c=10)), doesn't initialize c to null/undefined , instead throws an error when trying to reference c, my question was why does ruby intializes to nil even if the code did not execute after the "and" –  Mudassir Ali Mar 6 '13 at 6:54
    
Because it is loose language. It's just how Ruby works. Ruby doesn't have a number of restraints or restrictions that other languages have. It's like asking why you don't have to define variables when you declare them. –  Blaine Mar 6 '13 at 7:18
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