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I am having trouble understanding the concept of recurrences. Given you have T(n) = 2T(n/2) +1 how do you calculate the complexity of this relationship? I know in mergesort, the relationship is T(n) = 2T(n/2) + cn and you can see that you have a tree with depth log2^n and cn work at each level. But I am unsure how to proceed given a generic function. Any tutorials available that can clearly explain this?

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

The solution to your recurrence is T(n) ∈ Θ(n).

Let's expand the formula:

  • T(n) = 2*T(n/2) + 1. (Given)
  • T(n/2) = 2*T(n/4) + 1. (Replace n with n/2)
  • T(n/4) = 2*T(n/8) + 1. (Replace n with n/4)
  • T(n) = 2*(2*T(n/4) + 1) + 1 = 4*T(n/4) + 2 + 1. (Substitute)
  • T(n) = 2*(2*(2*T(n/8) + 1) + 1) + 1 = 8*T(n/8) + 4 + 2 + 1. (Substitute)

And do some observations and analysis:

  • We can see a pattern emerge: T(n) = 2k * T(n/2k) + (2k − 1).
  • Now, let k = log2 n. Then n = 2k.
  • Substituting, we get: T(n) = n * T(n/n) + (n − 1) = n * T(1) + n − 1.
  • For at least one n, we need to give T(n) a concrete value. So we suppose T(1) = 1.
  • Therefore, T(n) = n * 1 + n − 1 = 2*n − 1, which is in Θ(n).

Resources:

However, for routine work, the normal way to solve these recurrences is to use the Master theorem.

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