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Is this:

int x=0;
for (int i=0;i<100;i++) 
    x++;
for (int i=0;i<100;i++) 
    x--;
for (int i=0;i<100;i++) 
    x++;
return x;

Same as this:

int x=0;
for (int i=0;i<100;i++){
    x++;
    x--;
    x++;
}
return x;

Note: This is just an example, the real loop would be much more complex.

So are these two loops the same or is the second one faster?

EDIT: Java or C++. I was wondering about the both.
I didn't know that compiler would actually optimize the code.

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What language are you using? –  Blender Mar 6 '13 at 7:07
    
FYI the compiler will optimize your actual complex code entirely different than the trivial code you posted. –  Pubby Mar 6 '13 at 7:07
    
seen ? stackoverflow.com/questions/145389/… –  freak Mar 6 '13 at 7:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Unoptimized: three loops take longer, since there are three sets of loop opcodes.

Optimized, it depends on the optimizer. A good optimizer might be smart enough to realize that the x++;x--; statements in the single-loop version cancel each other out, and eliminate them. A really smart optimizer might be able to do the same thing with the separate loops. A ridiculously smart optimizer might figure out what the code is doing, and just replace the whole block with return 100; (see added note below)

But the real-world answer for optimization is usually: fuhgeddaboutit. If your code gets its job done correctly, and fast enough to be useful, leave it alone. Only if actual tests show it's too slow should you profile to identify the bottlenecks and replace them with more efficient code. (Or a better algorithm entirely.)

Programmers are expensive, CPU cycles are cheap, and there are plenty of other tasks with bigger payoffs. And more fun to write, too.


about the "ridiculously smart optimizer" bit: the D language offers Compile-Time Function Evaluation. CTFE allows you to use virtually the full capability of the language to compute something at build time, then insert only the computed answer into the runtime code. In other words, you can explicitly turn the entire compiler into your optimizer for selected chunks of code.

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If you count each increment, decrement, assignment and comparison as one operation, your first example has some 900 operations, while your second example has ~500. That is, if the code is executed as is and not optimized. It should be obvious which is more performant.

In reality the code may or may not be optimized by a compiler, and different compilers for different languages will do quite a different job at optimization.

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