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I have many Yes/No answers in my script. How can I create a function to minimize the size of my script?

I have the following:

function ask {
    read -n 1 -r
    if [[ $REPLY =~ ^[Yy]$ ]]
    then
            return 1;
    else
            exit
            echo "Abort.."
    fi
}

ask "Continue? [y/N] "

It works fine. But the Question "Continue? [y/N] is not displayed. How can I "transfer" this text to my function

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use $1 variable:

function ask {
    echo $1        # add this line
    read -n 1 -r
    if [[ $REPLY =~ ^[Yy]$ ]]
    then
            return 1;
    else
            exit
            echo "Abort.."
    fi
}

Edit: as noted by @cdarke, 'echo' call can be avoided thanks to '-p' switch in read:

# echo $1
# read -n 1 -r
read -n 1 -r -p "$1"
share|improve this answer
    
Oh, that is very simple. Thank you very much! :) –  Vince Mar 6 '13 at 7:41
2  
You don't need the echo, read in Bash has a -p option to give a prompt. read can also prompt in ksh, but the syntax is var?prompt. –  cdarke Mar 6 '13 at 8:08
    
@cdarke Yes, but it also conflicts with the ksh/zsh coproc read option which is why I typically recommend against it. -p in Bash has some advantages if used in combination with -e, otherwise it's equivalent to printf %s 'prompt' >&2 which I'd say is better otherwise. –  ormaaj Mar 6 '13 at 8:53
1  
At the very least, you need to switch the order of exit and echo "Abort..", since right now you won't reach the echo statement. Also, consider whether you really want to exit, or merely return 0. Also, in shell parlance, return 1 indicates failure of some kind, not true as in most programming languages, so you probably want to change it so that you return 0 when $REPLY is yes, and return 1 otherwise. –  chepner Mar 6 '13 at 13:49
    
@omaaj: I gave up trying to be portable between shells ages ago, they differ in detail too much. I prefer to use the features that a shell is good at rather than the lowest common denominator. I see little merit in trying to write generic scripts unless you have a platform that only supports one shell. Android might be an example of that, using MKSH (and ignoring SL4A). –  cdarke Mar 7 '13 at 8:08

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