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I have three interfaces:

public interface Combinable<V> {
    V add(V other);
}

public interface Sublistable<V> {
    boolean hasSublist();
    List<V> getSublist();
    void setSublist(List<V> sublist);
}

public interface HasUniqueIdentifier {
    String getUniqueIdentifier();
}

and 4 classes that implement some or all of these interfaces:

public class Grandparent implements HasUniqueIdentifier, 
                                    Sublistable<Parent>, 
                                    Combinable<Grandparent> 
{   List<Parent> sublist; ... }

public class Parent implements HasUniqueIdentifier, 
                               Sublistable<Child>, 
                               Combinable<Parent> 
{   List<Child> sublist; ... }

public class Child implements HasUniqueIdentifier, 
                              Sublistable<Grandchild>, 
                              Combinable<Child> 
{   List<Grandchild> sublist; ...  }

public class Grandchild implements HasUniqueIdentifier, 
                                   Combinable<Grandchild> 
{    }

I would like to have a generic method that does the following:

public <V, T extends HasUniqueIdentifier & Combinable<T> & Sublistable<V>> 
List<T> combine(List<T> items) {
    Multimap<String, T> similarItemMap = HashMultimap.create();
    for (T item: items) {
        similarItemMap.put(item.getUniqueIdentifier(), item);
    }

    List<T> output = new ArrayList<T>();
    for (Collection<T> similarCollection : similarItemMap.asMap().values()) {
        List<T> similarItems = Lists.newArrayList(similarCollection);
        T source = similarItems.get(0);
        for (int i = 0; i < similarItems.size(); i++) {
            source = source.add(similarItems.get(i));
        }
        output.add(source);
    }

    for (T item : output) {
        if (item.hasSublist()) {
            item.setSublist(combine(item.getSublist));
        }
    }
    return output;
}

Realizing that this could create an infinite loop (unless the bottom class -- Grandchild -- implemented Sublistable and set hasSublist() { return false; }, or something), as well as the fact that this method is kind of crazy with generics, I have to ask: Is there some way that I can rewrite this a bit so that I can call the method in this way:

combine(listOfGrandparents)

or should I give up on this being one method and try to refactor it in a better way?


Edit: To better explain what it is that I'm trying to do, I have a list of objects of type A. Each object a has a list of objects of type B. Each object b has a list of objects of type C, and so on, until eventually type T (for some varying level of T) doesn't have a sublist anymore.

Each type basically has three things that it needs to do for a "merge" or "combine" method:

  1. Collect all "like" items into a container, using the item.getUniqueIdentifier() method
  2. Combine all the like items into one item, using the source.add(other) method
  3. If the item has a sublist, do a merge on the sublist.

Since each item behaves so similarly, it would be nice if I could use a single method instead of having to have n methods, one for each type. Unfortunately, since none of the types are guaranteed to be the same (other than having implemented some or all of the given interfaces above), creating a generic method proves to be difficult. Is there some way to do this that I'm missing?


Edit 2: I've found a method that kind of works. Basically, it changes to this:

public <V extends HasUniqueIdentifier & Combinable<V>, 
        T extends HasUniqueIdentifier & Combinable<T>> 
List<T> combine(List<T> items) {
    Multimap<String, T> similarItemMap = HashMultimap.create();
    for (T item: items) {
        similarItemMap.put(item.getUniqueIdentifier(), item);
    }

    List<T> output = new ArrayList<T>();
    for (Collection<T> similarCollection : similarItemMap.asMap().values()) {
        List<T> similarItems = Lists.newArrayList(similarCollection);
        T source = similarItems.get(0);
        for (int i = 0; i < similarItems.size(); i++) {
            source = source.add(similarItems.get(i));
        }
        output.add(source);
    }

    for (T item : output) {
        if (item instanceof Sublistable<?>) {
            @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
            Sublistable<V> sublistableItem = ((Sublistable<V>)sublistableItem);
            if (sublistableItem.hasSublist()) {
                sublistableItem.setSublist(combine(sublistableItem.getSublist));
            }
        }
    }
    return output;
}

Unfortunatey, this method requires both a @SupressWarnings and an instanceof, which I would like to avoid if possible. I haven't found anything else, though, yet.

share|improve this question
2  
If you already ask yourself this question, this probably is a good sign that a refactoring would be wise. Especially, considering that other people will at some point have to understand a method that the author himself calls "crazy" ;) –  bigge Mar 6 '13 at 7:44
    
Combinable doesn't seem to be used anywhere, instead of hasSublist you could just check whether getSublist returns a list that is empty or null. But I would start with editing your post and adding a paragraph to explain what you want the method to do for that's unclear (and therefore a good indication that refactoring is a good idea) –  beny23 Mar 6 '13 at 7:50
    
@bigge: Yeah, the alternative is to have combine(List<Grandparent> items), combine(List<Parent> items), combine(List<Child> items), and combine(List<Grandchild> items), though, which doesn't sit well with me either. @beny23: Combinable is used in the source.add(similarItems.get(i)) line. I'll update the description with what it is that I'm trying to do exactly, as well. –  ashays Mar 6 '13 at 8:04
    
It seems to me as if you are trying to implement flatMap. Given a list of grandparents, you want a list of all their "elements", which happen to be parents. Given a list of parents you want a list of all their "elements" and so on. If you called it twice, as in combine(combine(grandparents)) you'd get children. Thrice and you'd get grandchildren. I'm completely bewildered by the setSublist(...) though. –  Ben Schulz Mar 6 '13 at 12:05
    
@BenSchulz: It's not quite a flatten. The hierarchy is still preserved. It just finds like elements and combines them, and then finds like elements in their children, and combines them, and so on. It is possible that the entire tree would be kept exactly the same, assuming that every item, subitem, and so on had a unique identifier (in comparison to the other nodes that share the same parent, at least) at its level. –  ashays Mar 6 '13 at 17:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your first solution is fine, given that GrandChild implements Sublistable<Void> vacuously. The tree is more uniform and easier to handle recursively. You may also want to have one merged interface Node<T,V> extends HasUniqueIdentifier, Combinable<T>, Sublistable<V>{}

If you don't want GrandChild implements Sublistable, your 2nd solution is also fine. A single instanceof to test a marker interface isn't a sin. The code can be rewritten as

public <T extends HasUniqueIdentifier & Combinable<T>> 
List<T> combine(List<T> items) 
{
    ...
    List<T> output = new ArrayList<T>();
    ...

    for (T item : output) {
        if (item instanceof Sublistable<?>) 
            combineSublist((Sublistable<?>)item);

    return output;
}

private <V> void combineSublist(Sublistable<V> sublistableItem)
{
    if (sublistableItem.hasSublist()) {
        sublistableItem.setSublist(combine(sublistableItem.getSublist));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Does this make the assumption that V has to extend HasUniqueIdentifier & Combinable<V> (in order to make the call to combine again)? Also, does this put us under the assumption that every Sublistable<T> has to have such a T that implements those interfaces as well? –  ashays Mar 6 '13 at 17:04
    
good point. Sublistable is not constrained enough so that its sublist can be combine()-ed. ideally we want to test if item instanceof Sublistable<? extends Combinable<?>> but there's no easy way to do that. So you probably want to strengthen Sublistable to Sublistable<V extends Combinable<V>>. If that's not possible, maybe a new subinterface Foo<V extends Combinable<V>> extends Sublistable<V>, and Parent implements Foo<Child>, so the code can test item instanceof Foo –  irreputable Mar 6 '13 at 17:22

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