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What is the best for index field, and space token on hard disk/RAM? Biginteger or Varchar(15) ? I can have for example such index number:

from  10000001 to 45281229703 and higher...

But what is better to choose? Also on non-indexing field what field type is better?

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A better question is which type correctly represents the field .. once that is answered, use it. If there is no measured performance problem (with a setup that can also measure the performance of alternatives), then there is no performance problem - don't "optimize" like this. –  user166390 Mar 6 '13 at 7:58
    
@pst trouble is that bigint and varchar - both represent's the field normaly and so, how i need –  brabertaser1992 Mar 6 '13 at 8:04
    
No. One represents a number. The other represents text (which might be the textual representation of a number). Which is correct? –  user166390 Mar 6 '13 at 8:07
    
@pst bigint is one –  brabertaser1992 Mar 6 '13 at 8:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

BIGINT is always 8 bytes, VARCHAR(15) is 1..16 bytes depending on value length, so BIGINT needs less memory on large numnbers, but more memory on small numbers (shorter than 7 digits). Also, BIGINT is faster.

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but as foreign key in other table? for example: id text for_id, that for id i must do as bigint too, right? So what to choose? ) if i have from 1 to 45281229703 and higher row's –  brabertaser1992 Mar 6 '13 at 7:51
    
also unsigned/signed here is big difference? –  brabertaser1992 Mar 6 '13 at 7:52
    
Also remember that Varchar requires an encoding translation and is therefor ambiguous, a raw number does not have this problem. –  0xCAFEBABE Mar 6 '13 at 7:54
    
oh, sorry my mistake, from 10000001 to 45281229703 is that big difference in types? –  brabertaser1992 Mar 6 '13 at 7:55

varchar adds overhead:

length of the string needs stored (extra 2 bytes IIRC in MySQL) per field and in the index requires more processing for collation on comparison

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but as foreign key in other table? for example: id text for_id, that for id i must do as bigint too, right? –  brabertaser1992 Mar 6 '13 at 7:50
    
yes that also bigint –  PSR Mar 6 '13 at 7:50
    
also unsigned/signed here is big difference? –  brabertaser1992 Mar 6 '13 at 7:53
    
oh, sorry my mistake, from 10000001 to 45281229703 is that big difference in types? –  brabertaser1992 Mar 6 '13 at 7:56

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